New Pluto photos are blowing minds

New close-up image of Pluto is released by NASA (Photo by NASA/Reuters).
A new close-up image of a region near Pluto's equator reveals a range of youthful mountains rising as high as 11,000 feet (3,500 meters) above the surface of the icy body. 

This afternoon, NASA shared the first of many new views of Pluto to come. Captured yesterday as the New Horizon's flew through the Pluto system (Pluto, Charon, Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra), these images are AH-MAZING.

Just before the flyby, New Horizon's sent back this image of Pluto:

Pluto nearly fills the frame in this image from the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) aboard NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, taken on Jul. 13, 2015, when the spacecraft was 476,000 miles from the surface. 

During the flyby the spacecraft was able to resolve surface features like this (near the bottom left of the heart shaped area):

A new close-up image of a region near Pluto's equator reveals a range of youthful mountains rising as high as 11,000 feet (3,500 meters) above the surface of the icy body. 

These are MOUNTAINS. ON PLUTO. They are estimated to be over 11,000 feet high, made of ice, and they are blowing planetary geologists' minds.

And if that wasn't enough, here's what Pluto's largest moon, Charon, looks like up close:

This image provided by NASA on Wednesday shows Pluto's largest moon, Charon, made by the New Horizons spacecraft. 

It has a surprising lack of craters (hinting that its surface is newer than we thought) and there is a canyon slicing across the edge of the moon in the upper right that could be 4 to 6 miles deep.

If these pics don't make you go WOW, I don't even want to know you.

@Summer_Ash, In-house Astrophysicist