So that’s what they mean by ‘bath salts’

Updated
 
Containers of the synthetic drugs known as "bath salts."
Containers of the synthetic drugs known as "bath salts."
Chris Knight/AP Photo

We are not talking about your mom’s “Calgon, take me away.” Natasha Vargas-Cooper’s new story in Spin Magazine is a really good primer on the synthetic drug called ”bath salts.” My favorite part (and by favorite, I mean the part that terrified me):

“Starting in late 2010, an influx of violent, irrational, self-destructive users began to congest hospital ERs throughout the States. A 19-year-old West Virginia man claimed he was high on bath salts when he stabbed his neighbor’s pygmy goat while wearing women’s underwear; a Mississippi man skinned himself alive while under the influence. Users staggered in, or were carried in, consumed by extreme panic, tachycardia, deep paranoia, and heart-attack symptoms. (Perhaps the most infamous incident tied to bath salts is Rudy Eugene’s horrific face-eating attack in Miami in May, although conclusive toxicology reports have yet to be released; still, the fact that this feels like the closest thing to a credible explanation for chewing a homeless man’s head for 18 minutes speaks volumes about the drug’s reputation.) “

Just read it… and weep.

Explore:

Drugs

So that's what they mean by 'bath salts'

Updated