Sarah Palin on the big screen

Updated
 
Sarah Palin would like to thank the Academy
Sarah Palin would like to thank the Academy
Ed Andrieski/AP

Years after Sarah Palin failed to make it to the White House, she continues to succeed in staying in the spotlight. She commissioned Stephen Bannon to make a documentary about saving the environment herself.

The film, perhaps over-looking her national defeat as a vice-presidential nominee, is titled The Undefeated, and it debuts soon in Iowa and other early primary states. It addresses her controversial decisions, like deciding to end her term as governor a year-and-a half early. Her decision to once again to fix her image, and “refudiate” the media’s negative comments, is seen by some as a sign that she may still join in the 2012 run for president. 

RealClearPolitics.com got an exclusive screening of the rough cut and described the portrayal of Palin as a both a heroine and martyr:

Divided into three acts, the film makes the case that despite the now cliched label, Palin was indeed a maverick who confronted the powerful forces lined up against her to achieve wide-ranging success in a short period of time. The second part of the film’s message is just as clear, if more subjective: that Sarah Palin is the only conservative leader who can both build on the legacy of the Reagan Revolution and bring the ideals of the tea party movement to the Oval Office.

Rife with religious metaphor and unmistakable allusions to Palin as a Joan of Arc-like figure, “The Undefeated” echoes Palin’s “Going Rogue” in its tidy division of the world between the heroes who are on her side and the villains who seek to thwart her at every turn.

No one said it wasn’t fiction.

By Noor Gharzeddine

Sarah Palin and The Last Word OMFG

Sarah Palin on the big screen

Updated