Elizabeth Warren says Americans are sick of big banks and their army of lobbyists

Updated

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When it comes to Wall Street misbehavior, progressive icon Elizabeth Warren says Americans are mad as hell, and they aren’t going to take it anymore.

The Democratic Senate candidate in Massachusetts pointed to the country’s biggest bank JPMorgan – which was humiliated this month by billions in trading losses after massive, ill-fated bets went sour –  as the latest evidence that the country is pining for stronger financial reform.

“The biggest financial institutions have plenty of money to spread around and they have hired an army of lobbyists,” Warren told msnbc’s Ed Schultz on Thursday. 

“But the American people have gotten wise to the game, they now see what’s happening. I think there’s a real pushback to say enough of this, we’re not doing this anymore.”

Warren has been pushing Congress to revive the Glass-Steagall Act, which put far stricter limits on commercial banks than financial institutions operate under today.

She also ripped presumed Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, who argued this week that J Morgan’s loss was just the “normal course of business.”

 “Mitt Romney is the one who said if he gets to be president of the United States, he will lead the charge on the first day to repeal all of the financial regulations. This plays directly into the hands of what the largest financial institutions are doing and JP Morgan Chase is the latest example. They didn’t learn from the crash. What they learned was to push Congress to keep lobbying,” she said.

Warren is in a heated race against Republican Sen. Scott Brown as she tries to capture the seat held for nearly 46 years by Ted Kennedy before Brown won it in a shocking upset in 2010.

The Massachusetts Senate race is considered a must-watch this year, as it’s one of the Dems’ few viable opportunities to pick off a GOP-held seat. 

 

Elizabeth Warren says Americans are sick of big banks and their army of lobbyists

Updated