Guess who’s coming to congressional dinners?

Updated
A wet and heavy mixture of rain and snow covers the north side of the bronze Statue of Freedom on the top of the U.S. Capitol Dome March 6, 2013 in...
A wet and heavy mixture of rain and snow covers the north side of the bronze Statue of Freedom on the top of the U.S. Capitol Dome March 6, 2013 in...
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Who says bipartisanship is dead? Certainly not Florida Reps. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, a Democrat, and Republican Daniel Webster.

The one-time colleagues in Florida’s state legislature started a dinner club on Capitol Hill that includes more than two dozen members from both parties.

“You’re a lot more likely to be willing to work with someone that you like and that you know,” Rep. Wasserman Schultz said. “When you know someone personally and realize that they’re not the ogre that has been portrayed it’s a lot easier to work with them.”

The group started out small with the two lawmakers bringing a handful of members from their own parties to the first group dinner.  To come to subsequent dinners, each previously invited guest had to invite a date from the opposing party.  Wasserman Schultz, who also chairs the Democratic National Committee, is hoping that the regular dinners will bring more open dialogue.

“We’re actually finally evolving because we have people who have continued to come and then word has spread. We’re starting to talk about issues now and our difference,” said Wasserman Schultz. “We’ve even had progressive and Tea Party members come to these dinners, where we can sort of not have anyone around and really be open and honest about what we think should happen and how we can get there.”

Guess who's coming to congressional dinners?

Updated