More than 100 goats hired to landscape Congressional Cemetery

Updated
Goats are released from a trailer at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013.
Goats are released from a trailer at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013.
Charles Dharapak/AP

On Wednesday, over 100 goats were unleashed at The Historic Congressional Cemetery to help clean up the landmark.

Yes, goats.

The historic landmark  welcomed the herd to help rid the cemetery of the vines, ivy and weeds, while also helping to fertilize the ground. The Eco-Goats, as they’re being called, are from a Davidsonville, Md., farm that rents out ecologically sustainable grazing animals. These goats will graze 24 hours a day, 6 days a week and will take their “recess” in a pen just outside the cemetery.

The idea of using goats to graze stems from Los Angeles, where goats were hired to eat thick weeds on a steep slope at the corner of 4th and Hill streets.

The Congressional  Cemetery, which is owned and preserved by the nonprofit Association for the Preservation of The Historic Congressional Cemetery, was founded in 1807 and is home to hundreds of congressmen and their families.

The goats may be the new kids on the congressional block, but they aren’t the only new imports. On Thursday The National Zoo announced that this week two Samatran cubs were born.

Explore:

More than 100 goats hired to landscape Congressional Cemetery

Updated