Supreme Court strikes down Defense of Marriage Act

Updated
 
Supreme Court strikes down Defense of Marriage Act
Supreme Court strikes down Defense of Marriage Act
Associated Press

In a breakthrough legal victory, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled this morning that the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional. In a 5-4 ruling, the court majority said the anti-gay law is discriminatory: “DOMA singles out a class of persons deemed by a State entitled to recognition and protection to enhance their own liberty.”

The decision was written by Justice Kennedy, who was joined by Justices Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayor, and Kagan. More soon.

First Update: The full ruling is online here (pdf); the Scotusblog description of the case is here; and previous MaddowBlog coverage is here.

Second Update: From the ruling: DOMA is “unconstitutional as a deprivation of the equal liberty of persons that is protected by the Fifth Amendment.”

Third Update: Pete Williams’ initial read suggests this ruling is “broad” enough for marriage-equality proponents “to attack laws in other states.”

Fourth Update: Some of the reach of the ruling will depend on a deeper analysis of the decision itself, but keep in mind that the end of DOMA will have significant consequences. The Defense Department, for example, ended DADT, but could not apply equal benefits to gay servicemembers because of this law. Now that it’s been struck down, it’s no longer an issue.

Fifth Update: It’s worth clarifying that the DOMA ruling does not extend marriage equality to all 50 states, but rather, as Amy Howe explained on Scotusblog, that “same-sex couples who are legally married will be entitled to equal treatment under federal law– with regard to, for example, income taxes and Social Security benefits.”

Sixth Update: The other major Supreme Court case on gay rights was a challenge to California’s Prop 8. In this case, Chief Justice John Roberts and the court majority punted on procedural grounds, saying the defendants lacked the standing needed to defend the case in court. The full ruling is online here (pdf).

Seventh Update: From Scotusblog’s summary of this morning’s Prop 8 ruling in Perry:  ”After the two same-sex couples filed their challenge to Proposition 8 in federal court in California, the California government officials who would normally have defended the law in court, declined to do so. So the proponents of Proposition 8 stepped in to defend the law, and the California Supreme Court (in response to a request by the lower court) ruled that they could do so under state law. But today the Supreme Court held that the proponents do not have the legal right to defend the law in court. As a result, it held, the decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, the intermediate appellate court, has no legal force, and it sent the case back to that court with instructions for it to dismiss the case.”

Eighth Update: The Prop 8 ruling was 5-4, but not along traditional ideological lines. The majority included Justices Roberts, Scalia, Breyer, Ginsburg, and Kagan. An unexpected combination, to be sure.

Marriage Equality, Supreme Court, DOMA and Gay Rights

Supreme Court strikes down Defense of Marriage Act

Updated