‘Privacy is often described as the “right to be left alone,” but that’s not a value that seems terribly important in the GOP right now’

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Can the GOP really nominate a candidate who opposes contraception? Really? Truly? In 2012? Jeffrey Toobin writes on the New Yorker’s new politics page:

Over the years the modern Republican Party has reflected both libertarian and authoritarian tendencies. Both survive, in a way. When it comes to taxes and regulation, the libertarian side of the party is ascendant. Even the rhetoric of compassionate conservatism has faded from view. But with regard to civil liberties, the G.O.P. has embraced state power with a vengeance. Whether it’s the rights of wartime detainees, or abortion rights, or the rights of gay people to marry (or to be free from discrimination), contemporary Republican leaders reflect clear moral disapproval. (Even Ron Paul, who is often described as a libertarian, is a fierce opponent of a woman’s right to choose abortion. And Rick Perry recently announced that he’s against a right to abortion even in cases of rape or incest.) Privacy is often described as “the right to be left alone,” but that’s not a value that seems terribly important in the G.O.P. right now.

Some form of opposition to contraception, as we reported last night, has become a majority opinion in this year’s Republican field.

The video above is from Friday in New Hampshire. (Segment from the show here.)

Reproductive Rights

'Privacy is often described as the "right to be left alone," but that's not a value that seems terribly important in the GOP right now'

Updated