Prejudice still not in the national interest

Updated
 
Prejudice still not in the national interest
Prejudice still not in the national interest
Congressman Darrell Issa/Flickr

Steve Benen does a nice job today taking apart Texas Governor Rick Perry’s new anti-gay ad. Prejudice is just not in the national interest, as we can see from the cost of enforcing Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell and the advantages of ending it.

What stands between professed social conservatives and their own professed goals? Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour is on a farewell tour this week, with a series of “values” speeches about how to “Keep Mississippi Moving.”

Mr. Barbour delivered part one today, “Values That Made America Great”:

If we had more intact families, led by two parents; if we had fewer children born to teenage girls; if parents required their children to take advantage of the education we offer them, and, in fact, supported their kids
and their schools; and if everyone who can work, did work or at least tried to get a job; I assure you every problem and shortcoming we have as a state would get better … far better.

With regard to “intact families,” Governor Barbour made it clear in January what he means:

Finally, I am proud that Mississippi cast the highest percentage of its vote of any state in favor of the Defense of Marriage Act, defining marriage as a union between one man and one woman.

But those aren’t the only families in Mississippi, even if Governor Barbour would prefer it that way. See also “Mississippi leads nation in same-sex child rearing”:

Although the state ranks 41st nationwide in its overall ratio of same-sex couples, the portion of those who raise children outranks the rest of the country.

Nearly 6,300 gay or lesbian couples live together statewide, with one-third of them raising children

None of those parents meet Mississippi’s legal definition for an intact household, and none of them ever can. They make the best of it and they wait for change. Maybe Governor Barbour should give them an award for perseverance.

Haley Barbour, Mississippi and Civil Rights

Prejudice still not in the national interest

Updated