NRA still not backing down

Updated
Wayne LaPierre, executive vice president of the National Rifle Association (NRA), speaks during a news conference in Washington December 21, 2012.
Wayne LaPierre, executive vice president of the National Rifle Association (NRA), speaks during a news conference in Washington December 21, 2012.
Joshua Roberts/REUTERS

It’s more of the same from Wayne LaPierre.

The National Rifle Association CEO will tell the Senate Judiciary Committee, during a much-anticipated hearing on gun control on Wednesday, that the federal government should not fault responsible gun owners for the acts of criminals by passing new legislation.

“Law abiding gun owners will not accept blame for the acts of violent of deranged criminals. Nor do we believe the government should dictate what we can lawfully own and use to protect our families,” LaPierre will say, according to prepared remarks released Tuesday.

LaPierre will insist that more gun control laws are “not a solution” to reducing crime.

He made a similar argument shortly after last month’s deadly school shooting in Newtown, Conn., saying gun owners were being “demonized” and that more guns—not less-were the solution.

According to the prepared remarks, LaPierre will again call for armed security at schools, blame the country’s mental health system, and insist universal background checks will never work because “criminals will never submit to them.”

He will add: “We need to be honest about what works and what does not work. Proposals that would only serve to burden the law-abiding have failed in the past and will fail in the future.”

Mark Kelly, the husband of former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords—who was shot at an event in Tucson in 2011—will also testify.

Earlier this month, Obama unveiled a slew of new policies aimed at limiting gun violence. He  is pushing for requiring criminal background checks on all gun sales, banning “military style” assault weapons, limiting ammunition magazines to 10 rounds and strengthening penalties for gun trafficking.

NRA still not backing down

Updated