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How OJ's 'guilty' and 'not guilty' verdicts explain American justice

06:00

As Americans debate police reform, MSNBC's Chief Legal Correspondent Ari Melber reports on the key differences between two systems of justice in the U.S. and how the famous O.J Simpson case illustrates American courts, and implications for potential reforms of how Americans can take police to court. This is an excerpt from a longer Special Report.