Wednesday's Mini-Report, 3.1.17

Today's edition of quick hits:* Syria: "Russian aircraft mistakenly bombed Syrian fighters who were being trained by the United States, the commander of the American-led operation in Iraq and Syria said on Wednesday. American advisers were about three miles away when the Russian strike occurred."* The vote was 68 to 31: "Montana Republican Ryan Zinke won Senate confirmation Wednesday to lead the Trump administration's Interior Department, garnering votes from several Democrats who threw support behind the one-term congressman."* The EPA is in peril: "The Office of Management and Budget has suggested deep cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency's budget that would reduce its staff by one-fifth in the first year and eliminate dozens of programs, according to details of a document reviewed by The Washington Post."* The politics surrounding foreign aid tends to be insane: "President Trump has proposed large cuts to foreign aid at a time of acute need across Africa and the Middle East, with four countries approaching famine and 20 million people nearing starvation, according to the United Nations."* The White House is giving Conway a pass: "A senior White House adviser 'inadvertently' endorsed the president's daughter's fashion line in a television interview last month without intending to benefit from the remark, the White House told the chief of the U.S. government ethics office on Tuesday."* This may turn out to be interesting: "Former senator Daniel Coats pledged on Tuesday that in his role as the nation's next spy chief he would work with Congress to investigate allegations that Russia interfered in the 2016 elections."* More conflicts: "President Donald Trump's order on Tuesday to rescind and rewrite federal water regulations not only coincides with his conservative agenda but also could cut his costs as an owner of a dozen U.S. golf courses, again raising concerns about conflict of interest in the White House."* I have a hunch the president won't care for this one bit: "[Donald Trump's speech to Congress] predictably topped the night's few other telecasts, grossing just more than 43 million viewers on eight networks airing coverage between 9 and 10:15 p.m. ET. On par with early metered market stats, a cumulative 27.8 overnight rating among households, it's still a ways off from President Barack Obama's first joint sessions meeting -- or even his first State of the Union. Compared to Obama's first address in 2009, Trump's pull is down by 17 percent."Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.