Thursday's Mini-Report, 2.27.20

Today's edition of quick hits.

Today's edition of quick hits:

* Japan: "Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Thursday asked all of Japan's schools to close for a month to help contain the spread of the coronavirus. The country is the second, after China, to shutter schools nationwide over the epidemic."

* Didn't Trump say on Monday that the markets looked good? "Wall Street suffered brutal losses on Thursday, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average swinging wildly through more than 1,000 points before closing down 1,190 points. It marks the worst week for the blue-chip index since the financial crisis."

* On a related note: "Earnings growth for U.S. companies will be stagnant in 2020 as a result of the coronavirus, according to Goldman Sachs."

* FDA: "About 150 prescription drugs -- including antibiotics, generics and some branded drugs without alternatives -- are at risk of shortage if the coronavirus outbreak in China worsens, according to two sources familiar with a list of at-risk drugs compiled by the Food and Drug Administration."

* She was right: "When the top EPA official overseeing its WaterSense program first heard President Donald Trump's rant about toilets that must be flushed a dozen times and modern faucets that only provide drips of water, she was at a loss for words."

* The Trump/Barr DOJ: "The Justice Department said Wednesday that it had created an official section in its immigration office to strip citizenship rights from naturalized immigrants, a move that gives more heft to the Trump administration's broad efforts to remove from the country immigrants who have committed crimes."

* It's about time: "Sixty-five years after 14-year-old Emmett Till was lynched in Mississippi, Congress has approved legislation designating lynching as a hate crime under federal law."

* Meet Stephen Schwartz: "A Trump nominee to serve on a court that hears claims against the government once argued that several federal agencies should be eliminated and that Social Security should be abolished because economic disparity 'is a natural aspect of the human condition.'"

* Confirming what was suspected: "The White House demanded the ouster of Pentagon policy chief John Rood last week after the former industry executive opposed the administration on plans to pull U.S. troops from Syria and its policy toward Chinese tech giant Huawei, six current and former Trump administration officials tell POLITICO."

See you tomorrow.