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Thursday's Mini-Report, 1.14.21

Today's edition of quick hits.

Today's edition of quick hits:

* I can't stop dwelling on reports like these: "Federal and state law enforcement agencies are bracing for violence planned by radical conservatives and extremists in Washington in the days before the inauguration."

* Maybe this will help a little? "Under heavy pressure from his advisers, President Trump on Wednesday released a five-minute video recorded in the Oval Office condemning last week's mob violence at the Capitol and urging his supporters to stand down from further rioting next week."

* Vaccine news: "Johnson & Johnson's one-dose coronavirus vaccine is safe and appears to generate a promising immune response in both young and elderly volunteers, according to trial data published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine."

* Quite a concern from the Capitol Police: "After seeing one of their colleagues killed last Wednesday, Capitol Police officers are angry that Republican members of Congress refuse to submit to the security changes put in place since then, and say they wouldn't even be surprised if some lawmakers helped organize the attack."

* Tracking radicalism: "Facebook Inc has seen an increase in signals indicating potential future acts of violence associated with efforts to contest the result of the U.S. presidential election since the Capitol siege last week, a company spokeswoman told Reuters."

* Census: "The U.S. Census Bureau has halted all work on President Trump's directive to produce a state-by-state count of unauthorized immigrants that would have been used to alter a key set of census numbers, NPR has learned."

* Flint: "Nine former Michigan officials, including ex-Gov. Rick Snyder, were charged Thursday for their roles in the Flint water crisis in a case one prosecutor said was about 'finally, finally, finally holding people accountable.'"

* Climate crisis: "As if catastrophic wildfires, a record-breaking hurricane season and a pandemic that brought the world to its knees weren't enough, 2020 nearly became the hottest year in recorded history."

* EPA: "Political officials at EPA have overruled the agency's career scientists to weaken a major health assessment for a toxic chemical contaminating the drinking water of an estimated 860,000 Americans, according to four sources with knowledge of the changes."

* Seems sensible: "Delta Air Lines won't allow travelers flying to the airports serving the Washington metropolitan area to check firearms on flights ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration, CEO Ed Bastian told CNBC on Thursday."

* On a related note: "Delta Air Lines has put 880 people on its no-fly list for not complying with its mask requirements and has banned others from flying with the airline for harassing other passengers or unruly behavior related to the U.S. election results, a spokesman told Reuters. Last week, supporters of outgoing President Donald Trump heckled Utah Senator Mitt Romney on a Delta flight from Salt Lake City to Washington D.C."

* I occasionally have to remind myself that Space Command isn't a joke: "The U.S. Air Force announced Wednesday that the new U.S. Space Command headquarters will be in Huntsville, Alabama, after the state was selected over five others competing for the project, including Colorado, where Space Command is provisionally located."

See you tomorrow.