Thursday's Campaign Round-Up, 11.12.20

Today's installment of campaign-related news items from across the country.

Today's installment of campaign-related news items from across the country.

* As expected, Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger (R) announced yesterday that state election officials are moving forward with a hand recount of votes in the presidential race. With about 97% of the vote counted, Joe Biden has an advantage in Georgia of more than 14,000 votes over Donald Trump.

* Speaking of Georgia, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution published a striking editorial yesterday, admonishing Republican Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler for attacking the integrity of the state's electoral process without evidence. "Reckless barely begins to touch on what Perdue and Loeffler have done," the editorial board said. "Without presenting reasons, they have assaulted Georgia's election system. That is dangerous behavior in this tense moment, both for this state and for the nation that is watching this risky sideshow."

* RNC Chair Ronna McDaniel accidentally told the truth yesterday, publishing a tweet that acknowledged the fact that Kamala Harris will be the vice president next year. She deleted the missive several hours later.

* On a related note, Trump will exit the White House in 10 weeks, but he nevertheless expects McDaniel to continue to lead the Republican National Committee.

* Four viral videos are apparently making the rounds among conservatives online, each suggesting Biden benefited from voter fraud. The Washington Post scrutinized the videos and found them to be baseless.

* Fourteen years after Karl Rove was accused of pressuring federal prosecutors to pursue trumped-up allegations of voter fraud to help GOP candidates, Rove wrote a Wall Street Journal op-ed that noted, "To win, Mr. Trump must prove systemic fraud, with illegal votes in the tens of thousands. There is no evidence of that so far. Unless some emerges quickly, the president's chances in court will decline precipitously."

* What went wrong with 2020 polling? It'll be a while before all of the data is scrutinized, but we've seen some preliminary assessments this week from Vox, FiveThirtyEight, and the New York Times.