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Pedestrians cross the street near the Wyoming State Capitol in downtown Cheyenne, Wyoming on June 19, 2019.
Pedestrians cross the street near the Wyoming State Capitol in downtown Cheyenne, Wyoming on June 19, 2019.Autumn Perry / The Washington Post via Getty Images, file

Thursday’s Campaign Round-Up, 3.10.22

Today’s installment of campaign-related news items from across the country.

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Today’s installment of campaign-related news items from across the country.

* In Wyoming’s state legislature, Donald Trump was pushing Republicans to ban crossover primary voting, fearing it might help Rep. Liz Cheney’s re-election chances. This week, however, the bill died when it failed to advance ahead of a legislative deadline.

* The Brennan Center for Justice at the New York University School of Law surveyed hundreds of local election officials nationwide, and as NBC News noted, the results showed “a large majority of them feel they need more federal government support to combat interference from political leaders and public threats.” Amid safety concerns, many are also considering leaving their roles.

* In North Carolina, the Republican U.S. Senate primary took a heated turn this week, when former Gov. Pat McCrory launched a new television ad, targeting Rep. Ted Budd for his recent rhetoric about Vladimir Putin.

* On a related note, Budd is running with Trump’s backing, but with the congressman struggling, Politico reported on “speculation in Trump world that the former president has grown to regret his early endorsement.”

* State Sen. Dallas Heard resigned this week as chair of the Oregon Republican Party, complaining of “wickedness” from within his own party. The state legislator also cited “communist psychological warfare tactics” for his decision.

* In Utah, where incumbent Republican Sen. Mike Lee is facing a challenge from independent Evan McMullin, Republican Sen. Mitt Romney will apparently remain neutral, saying both candidates are “friends.” It’s unusual for a senator not to endorse a home-state colleague from the same party.

* And in Arizona, Republican state senators this week advanced a proposal to ban same-day voter registration in the state, despite the fact that same-day voter registration does not currently exist in Arizona. The plan, evidently, is to preempt future attempts.