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Obama focuses on fiscal cliff impact on middle class

While Republicans argue about whether or not they are willing to break ties with Grover Norquist and his anti-tax pledge, President Obama has decided to make th
U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a statement on the U.S. "Fiscal Cliff" in the East Room of the White House in Washington, November 9, 2012. (Photo by Jason Reed/Reuters)
U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a statement on the U.S. "Fiscal Cliff" in the East Room of the White House in Washington, November 9, 2012.

While Republicans argue about whether or not they are willing to break ties with Grover Norquist and his anti-tax pledge, President Obama has decided to make the middle class the focus of his campaign for a deal to help avoid going over the fiscal cliff that came from last year's debt ceiling debate.

On Tuesday he'll host small business owners from across the country at the White House to discuss the impact the fiscal cliff would have. Wednesday he'll host a forum with middle class Americans who would be impacted, including some of his own supporters who responded to an email from top Obama adviser David Plouffe.

Then on Friday he'll take the show on the road, travelling to a Philadelphia suburb to talk about economic impact of not extending the Bush—era tax cuts for 98% of Americans and what it could mean for holiday shoppers making purchasing decisions today. The Obama team plans to push for a deal with a combination of spending cuts and taxes increases on the those earning more than $250,000 a year.

Meanwhile, Republicans seem to be pushing tax reform ideas focused primarily on closing loopholes, rather than agreeing to raise rates on the wealthy, ignoring recent polling showing at least 56% of Americans believe we should do just that.