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Cecil the lion featured on Empire State Building

Endangered animals were projected onto the Empire State Building to spread awareness about mass extinction.
An image of Cecil the lion is projected onto the Empire State Building as part of an endangered species projection to raise awareness, in New York, Aug. 1, 2015. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz/Reuters)
An image of Cecil the lion is projected onto the Empire State Building as part of an endangered species projection to raise awareness, in New York, Aug. 1, 2015. 

Cecil the lion and other endangered animals were projected onto the Empire State Building this weekend to spread awareness about mass extinction. 

Related: Jericho, 'brother' of Cecil the lion, is alive: Wildlife officials

On Saturday night, the New York City landmark was lit up with images of tigers, sea animals, birds, and more -- even King Kong himself got a cameo. Cecil the lion, who was killed this month in Africa and ignited backlash across the world, was also splashed onto the skyscraper. 

The light show was part of a promotion for "Racing Extinction," a documentary on the Discovery Channel airing in December on preserving iconic animals. 

An image of Cecil the lion is projected onto the Empire State Building as part of an endangered species projection to raise awareness, in New York, Aug. 1, 2015. 
People watch as an image of an animal is projected onto the Empire State Building as part of an endangered species projection to raise awareness, in New York, Aug. 1, 2015. 
Large images of endangered species are projected on the south facade of The Empire State Building, Aug. 1, 2015, in New York. 
Images of endangered species are projected on the The Empire State Building, Aug. 1, 2015, in New York. The projections are in part inspired by and produced by the filmmakers of an upcoming documentary called "Racing Extinction." 
Images are projected onto the Empire State Building as part of an endangered species projection to raise awareness, in New York Aug. 1, 2015.