IE 11 is not supported. For an optimal experience visit our site on another browser.

Hillary Clinton defends Obamacare

Former Secretary of State and 2016 potential Hillary Clinton offered a tempered defense the president’s healthcare law on Wednesday.
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks at Georgetown University on Feb. 25, 2014 in Washington, DC.
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks at Georgetown University on Feb. 25, 2014 in Washington, DC.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton offered a tempered defense of the President Obama's health care law on Wednesday.

“I think we are on the right track in many respects, but I would be the first to say if things aren’t working then we need people of good faith to come together and make evidence-based changes,” she said at an event to a health care group in Florida, according to CNN. 

Clinton, a possible 2016 candidate, is already polling at the top of the field in presidential surveys. A recent New York Times/CBS poll saw Clinton uniting the party, with 82% of Democrats on board with her run. In a handful of states' polled recently, Clinton trumps Republican potentials.

The speech signals how the potential candidate could approach the contentious law in an election.

“Part of the challenge is to clear away all the smoke and try to figure out what is working and what isn’t,” she said. “What do we need to do to try to fix this? Because it would be a great tragedy, in my opinion, to take away what has now been provided.”

Clinton said she particularly supported letting children stay on their parents' plans till they’re 26, but suggested that there should be a fix to the issue with small businesses that are “moving people from full-time work to part-time work to avoid contributing to their health care.”

"This is going to be challenging and I don't think we should throw the baby out with the bath," Clinton said, adding that it’s been hard to have a conversation in Washington because of the “misinformation.”

The health care law—President Barack Obama's signature legislative achievement—was approved in 2010 without Republican support and has been a source of contention since its introduction.