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    Actress Gina Torres on Hollywood’s colorism problem

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Actress Gina Torres on Hollywood’s colorism problem

03:35

Many Latin American countries have large Black communities, and in the U.S. alone there are about 6 million adults who identify as Afro-Latino. But Hollywood isn’t writing Afro-Latino roles or casting Afro-Latino actors. In a recent analysis of the 1,300 top grossing films from 2007 to 2019, only 6 lead roles were held by Afro-Latinos. “We need to see ourselves in film…If we can see ourselves then we feel like we have value,” John Leguizamo says.