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    Velshi: Despite ALL the warnings about fossil fuel, we're going the wrong way

    04:37
  • On 50th anniversary of Roe, abortion providers reflect on what’s changed since Dobbs

    10:29
  • View from Finland: Misinformation fight begins with education

    07:25
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    07:40
  • #VelshiBannedBookClub: Grace Lin’s “A Big Mooncake for Little Star”

    09:24
  • Fmr. Estonian President on Estonia’s “more aid faster” approach to Ukraine

    05:36
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  • As abortion pills become easier to get, Republicans push back in draconian ways

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  • “The debt ceiling is going to have to be increased,” says GOP Rep. Bacon

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  • Debating the validity of the Electoral College

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  • Fmr. Rep. Fred Upton: ‘You’re not going to balance a budget overnight,’ debt ceiling should be raised

    07:07
  • Velshi: George Santos & the death of shame 

    05:16
  • Velshi: GOP is playing with U.S. prosperity in fight over debt ceiling

    04:52
  • #VelshiBannedBookClub: “Their Eyes Were Watching God” by Zora Neale Hurston

    09:34
  • Fmr Congressmen on House GOP’s score-settling and “narrative of grievance”

    08:46
  • Britain's PM condemns Iran's execution of British-Iranian national

    01:09
  • #VelshiBannedBookClub: Police brutality, white privilege, and “All American Boys”

    08:22
  • Velshi: War is lost when resolve is lost

    03:08
  • New AZ Attorney General: ‘We have to remain vigilant’ in protecting democracy

    06:19
  • Fmr. Freedom Caucus member on the “mess” ahead for the GOP

    06:38

#VelshiBannedBookClub: Todd Strasser talks ‘Give a Boy a Gun’ 

06:35

This week’s meeting of the #VelshiBannedBookClub features “Give a Boy a Gun” by prolific Young Adult author Todd Strasser. “Give a Boy a Gun” was initially published in 2000 – just one year after the Columbine High School massacre. It is the first work of fiction to grapple with the new reality that followed after Columbine: a world where students can die in their classrooms. It is also one of the few books on this topic written for a young adult audience. This is the second weekend in a row that we have discussed the tragic realities of school shootings and the place fiction books can play in working through very serious feelings, generating useful conversation, and -- to whatever extent it is possible -- aiding in understanding.