Who’s Grover calling greedy?

Updated
By Anthony Reyes
Grover Norquist and Jack Abramoff (file)
Grover Norquist and Jack Abramoff (file)
Yuri Gripas/AP; Gerald Herbert/AP

lot has been written up lately about Grover Norquist as the debt-limit talks continue to make limited progress. Grover is the man Republicans in Washington continue to stand by as the country inches closer to an economic calamity.

Republicans in Congress will not budge on raising revenues knowing that Grover has their original signed copy of the Americans for Tax Reform pledge locked up in a fireproof vault. Ninety-five percent of Republicans in Congress signed it and Grover’s iron grip on all of them has never been so fully on display, therefore gaining a lot more scrutiny in the media. However, in another moment of #nostralawrence, our show has been calling Grover “the most powerful man in Washington that doesn’t live in the White House” for a while now. He has even been a guest on our show!

Well, yesterday, Grover took to Twitter to vent his frustration on the debt-limit talks by tweeting the following:

Who's Grover calling greedy?

Yes, the dude who reinforces billionaires’ arms over their bags of money is calling people greedy. The dude who passionately protects the incomes of hedge fund managers, Wall Street bankers, corporate jet owners and oil/ethanol profiteers. The dude who wants to prevent the slightest increase in their taxes or any changes to deductions or subsidies is calling people greedy. 

If you were to ever think of a caricature of greed in Washington you might actually think of this guy: lobbyist Jack Abramoff. It turns out that Grover and Abramoff are good old pals going back to their days in the College Republicans. Documents in the federal probe of the Abramoff scandal revealed Grover ”allowed his nonprofit, tax-exempt organization, Americans for Tax Reform, to be used as a pass-through for money that Abramoff’s clients handed over to finance lobbying campaigns aimed at influencing public officials. For his trouble, Norquist kept a cut of the funds.”

Making a profit off of peddling influence over a government by using your nonprofit, tax-exempt organization — that’s greedy.

Grover Norquist and Debt

Who's Grover calling greedy?

Updated