White House reevaluating birth control policy

Updated
White House reevaluating birth control policy
White House reevaluating birth control policy
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The Obama administration hinted at a compromise on the birth control mandate after an onslaught of complaints from Republicans and the Catholic Church.

“There are ways to, I think, help resolve this issue that ensures that we provide that important preventive service, that health care coverage, to all women… in a way that also tries to allay some of these concerns,” White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said today, not really getting into specifics.

President Obama’s health care reform law requires all health care plans to offer coverage for birth control. But, church-affiliated groups are concerned this new law forces them to violate their own religious beliefs.

The White House said it’s looking for solutions, but women working for these employers still need access to contraception regardless of their beliefs.

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell warned the policy went too far, calling it a “huge mistake.” He warned the White House, “Congress will act” if they don’t change it.

 

Republican presidential hopefuls piled on the criticism today, with Gingrich taking it a step further.

“Romneycare and Obamacare they’re too similar,” Gingrichtold a crowd in Ohio. “There’s been a lot of talk about the Obama administration’s attack on the Catholic Church. Well the fact is, Governor Romney insisted that Catholic hospitals give out abortion pills against their religious belief when he was governor.”

Issues over contraception and abortion have been thrust into the spotlight this past week after the Komen Foundation decided pull funding for Planned Parenthood. After major public backlash, the group reversed its decision and Komen official Karen Handel resigned.

Should religious schools and hospitals be exempt from the law that requires birth control to be included in employees’ health care coverage? Take our Last Word poll now.

Planned Parenthood and Barack Obama

White House reevaluating birth control policy

Updated