U.K. doctors: Chance of ‘good recovery’ for Malala

Updated
A Nepalese student holds a photo of Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, during a candlelight vigil to express support for her.
A Nepalese student holds a photo of Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, during a candlelight vigil to express support for her.
AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha

Malala Yousafzai has “a chance of making a good recovery” after being shot in the head by the Taliban, doctors at the British hospital where she’s being treated have said.

The 14-year-old Malala was targeted by the Taliban in Pakistan for “promoting secularism” and education in a region where girls are not permitted to go to school. Her shooting has inspired a groundswell of support and sympathy, making her into an international symbol for women’s rights and education for all. The Last Word first reported on the Malala story last Thursday.

“Doctors…believe she has a chance of making a good recovery on every level,” Dr. Dave Rosser, the  medical director at Birmingham’s  Queen Elizabeth Hospital said, NBCNews.com reported.

“Every boy and girl in the world who hears this story,” said msnbc’s Lawrence O’Donnell last week, “should know that they are hearing the story of a crime not just against Malala, but against humanity.”

“Tragically for Malala tonight,” O’Donnell continued, “Islam has not reached the point in its worldwide maturation curve where all Muslims can agree that there are a lot of things in the Koran that should best be ignored.”

Former U.K. prime minister Gordon Brown wrote an op-ed for the Huffington Post today championing Malala’s cause. ”Malala’s plight has unleashed an unprecedented outpouring of public support,” Brown wrote. “Now all of us must make that support count—and deliver on the cause she has been fighting for – her dream of education for every child.”

According to the BBC, “surgeons in the northwestern city of Peshawar removed the bullet that had entered her skull from close to her spinal cord.”  Specialists at the hospital in Birmingham, England where Malala was transferred will spend the next day assessing her condition and image-scanning her injuries.

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U.K. doctors: Chance of 'good recovery' for Malala

Updated