Ryan: Takes ‘too long’ to explain tax plan math

Updated
VP candidate Paul Ryan at a campaign event on Saturday in Derry, New Hampshire.
VP candidate Paul Ryan at a campaign event on Saturday in Derry, New Hampshire.
Jessica Rinaldi/Reuters

Paul Ryan said “it would take me too long to go through all of the math” on the proposed Romney-Ryan tax plan.

You know, tons of details, blah blah blah. No time, blah blah blah.

During an interview with Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace, the vice presidential candidate openly opted not take the time get into specifics when questioned on how the Republican ticket would pay for 20 percent tax cuts across the board.

“It would take me too long to go through all of the math,” said Ryan after being pressed for details. “But let me say it this way. You can lower tax rates by 20 percent across the board by closing loopholes and still have preferences for the middle class for things like charitable deductions, for home purchases, for healthcare.”

Ryan, the House Budget chairman, admitted there’s “disproportionate amount” of loopholes in the current tax code that benefit higher-income earners and vowed to limit deductions for this set. “When you close a tax write-off or a tax shelter for a higher-income person, more of their income is subject to taxation so we can lower tax rates,” he said. “That’s where we begin.”

Team Obama issued a response to his comments. “Romney has promised $5 trillion in tax cuts skewed toward millionaires and billionaires, but refused to say how he’d pay for them without raising taxes on the middle class or exploding the deficit,” The Obama campaign said. “He’s promised to repeal ObamaCare, but refused to say what he’d replace it with to protect the 129 million Americans with pre-existing conditions. He’s promised to repeal Wall Street reform, but refused to say what he’d replace it with so that big banks aren’t writing their own rules again.”

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie came to Team Romney’s defense of their hazy details, a general point of criticism for the campaign. “Governor Romney has a vision for the direction of this country,” Christie said on NBC’s Meet The Press. “He’s not an accountant. He’s not going to go line by line, as much as you’d like him to do, through the budget.”

Paul Ryan and Mitt Romney

Ryan: Takes 'too long' to explain tax plan math

Updated