Judge strikes down anti-union law

Updated
Protesters keeping up the pro-union effort on April 1 in Madison, Wisconsin.
Protesters keeping up the pro-union effort on April 1 in Madison, Wisconsin.
John Hart/AP

A Wisconsin judge voided a controversial law today which takes away collective bargaining rights for state workers. Judge Maryann Sumi said Republicans violated the state’s open meetings law by jamming it through the legislature. 

“The legislators were understandably frustrated by the stalemate existing on March 9, but that does not justify jettisoning compliance with the open meetings law in an attempt to move the budget repair bill to final action,” Sumi wrote in a 33-page decision.

In an attempt to slow down its passage, Democratic lawmakers infamously fled the state and refused to vote on the Republican-backed bill.

The anti-union bill set off massive protests near the state capitol in Madison and has been making its rounds in the court system since it got passed. It’s not over yet.

Pro-labor might have won this round, but the bill could still go into effect. The state Supreme Court scheduled arguments for June 6 and will decide then whether to take the case.

Gov. Scott Walker insists the bill is necessary in order to balance the state’s budget. GOP leaders have promised to pass the law again next month, if need be, as part of the state’s budget.

Scott Walker and Wisconsin

Judge strikes down anti-union law

Updated