Founding fathers fought for super PACs?

Updated

A new ad from the secretive right-wing group American Future Fund thanks Republican Senator Mitch McConnell for “defending free speech.” The 80-second spot entreats us, over some good ol’ American fiddles, to remind Obama that he swore an oath to uphold our right to free speech, by which it means the Supreme Court decision on Citizens United v. the FEC, which held that the First Amendment prohibited the government  from restricting political donations by corporations and unions. So in other words, it makes the argument our nation’s founding fathers “fought and died” for justice unlimited campaign spending. (I must’ve missed that lesson in my history text-book.)

“Don’t be fooled,” stated AFF Founder Nick Ryan. ”Obama and his team are attempting to hide their radical and dangerous plans under a cloak of so-called democracy. What they really want is to suppress the voices of those who disagree with them. They want more control over what is said and who is saying it. It’s un-American. It’s wrong.”

It’s worth mentioning the American Future Fund is itself a 501(c)(4), operating its own super PAC, the exact type of organization that the Citizens United ruling made possible. And now they’ve made an ad defending the same cause which enabled them to acquire the amount of money necessary to make an ad defending the same cause which enabled them to acquire the amount of money necessary to…

The irony is so sinister that I have to go and curl up in the fetal position. If you need me, I’ll be under the cloak of so-called democracy.

Campaign Finance and Mitch McConnell

Founding fathers fought for super PACs?

Updated