What we’re watching: Tue., Dec. 6, 2011

Updated
 
Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, a Republican, named Roy S. Roberts, right, a former vice president of General Motors Corp., as the next emergency manager of the troubled Detroit Public Schools during a press conference on May 4, 2011, at Cadillac Place in Detroit.
Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, a Republican, named Roy S. Roberts, right, a former vice president of General Motors Corp., as the next emergency manager of the troubled Detroit Public Schools during a press conference on May 4, 2011, at Cadillac Place in Detroit.
AP Photo/The Detroit News, Steve Perez

With the threat of a state takeover looming over Detroit, a coalition of groups is ramping up its efforts to suspend Michigan’s eight-month-old emergency manager law. 

The Republican-backed Public Act 4 allows the governor to appoint an emergency manager for any community or school district the state considers to be in a “financial emergency.”  Emergency managers have broad powers, including the ability to unilaterally dismiss elected officials, dissolve municipal governments, break collective bargaining agreements and sell public assets.


U.S. Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.) says the law not only violates the Constitution by putting in place an emergency manager who usurps the democratically elected representatives of the city, but is also “being applied in a discriminatory fashion” in municipalities with large African-American populations.

The Occupy Wall Street movement, evicted from encampments around the country, is shifting focus to occupying foreclosed homes.  Today’s national day of action will focus on the foreclosure crisis and protest fraudulent lending practices, corrupt securitization, and illegal evictions by banks.  


The Occupy movement actions, including eviction defense at foreclosed properties and takeovers of vacant properties by homeless families, will take place in more than 20 cities across the country.

Ford Motor Co. says its $128 million investment at an Ohio plant will protect nearly 2,000 jobs and shift medium-duty truck production from Mexico.

Gov. John Kasich (R-Ohio), on hand today at the Ford plant in Avon Lake west of Cleveland, says it shows manufacturing is reviving.  But Rep. Betty Sutton (D-Ohio) points out that Kasich did not actively support President Obama’s $85 billion auto bailout.

Even though Ford Motor Co. didn’t receive a bailout — as General Motors Co. and Chrysler Group LLC did — some have argued that Ford might not have survived if its rivals’ collapse had destroyed the auto supplier base.

What we're watching: Tue., Dec. 6, 2011

Updated