Obama lied about being born in Kenya to get into college, says Arizona’s top election official

Updated

We thought Arizona’s top election official had moved on from his embarrassing flirtation with birtherism last month.  But it turns out, he’s still drinking that Kool-Aid.

Secretary of State Ken Bennett got some national attention in May after threatening to keep President Barack Obama off the ballot in November unless he saw more proof that the president was born in Hawaii.  

Hawaiian officials have repeatedly confirmed that Obama was born in their state, but some extremists continue to claim that the president was born in Kenya, his father’s homeland.  So Bennett demanded Hawaii confirm Obama’s birth personally to him.  When they did, he apologized.

But the No. 2 elected official in Arizona (and co-chair of the Romney campaign in Arizona) now believes the president fraudulently claimed to be born in Kenya so he could get into college. He also believes the president has spent millions of dollars to cover it up.

Bennett revealed his bizarre theory at a Republican Party meeting on Thursday (June 14).

“Now, I know there’s a lot of people that are very skeptical as to whether the president was born in Hawaii,” Bennett said. “Personally, I believe that he was. I actually think he was fibbing about being born in Kenya when he was trying to get into college and doing things like writing a book and on and on and on.”

Bennett mentioned that he “thinks” President Obama sent $1.5 to $2 million to have his college records and “all that stuff” sealed, but doesn’t cite a source for those numbers or present any evidence to support his theory. 

“So if you’re spending money to seal something, that’s probably where the hanky panky was going on,” he continued.

Bennett is reportedly exploring a possible run for governor in 2014 when Jan “finger-wagging” Brewer’s term ends.  But first, he may have to issue a second apology to his state in as many months.  

Barack Obama

Obama lied about being born in Kenya to get into college, says Arizona's top election official

Updated