Tight polls aren’t worrying Obama campaign

Updated
President Barack Obama speaks at a campaign event at The Ohio State University Oval, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, in Columbus, Ohio.
President Barack Obama speaks at a campaign event at The Ohio State University Oval, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, in Columbus, Ohio.
AP Photo

According to latest NBC polls, the gender gap is shrinking between President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney in battleground states Nevada and Colorado.

Team Obama isn’t discouraged. Spokeswoman Jen Psaki appeared on The Daily Rundown to explain why the polls aren’t worrying them.

“This is a fundamental difference in this race,” Psaki said. “[President Obama] believes women should be able to make choices about their own health care. He doesn’t believe we should defund Planned Parenthood. He believes women should have access to affordable health care.”

Rundown guest host Luke Russert questioned Psaki why the campaign’s message heading into the final campaign days has turned from the economy to women’s health. Psaki says Richard Mourdouck’s recent comments brings women’s health to the forefront.

“[The economy] is an issue the president talks about but he couldn’t hold himself back from speaking to this given how outrageous the [Mourdock’s] comments were,” Psaki said. “But 99% of what the president talks about every single day is what he’s done to help bring this economy back from the brink of collapse and what he wants to do moving forward.”

Russert also brought to Psaki’s attention a Washington Post poll on white independent voters switching their support to Mitt Romney.

Psaki found the silver lining in that data by referencing other polls, especially in Ohio, where Obama’s message and record is helping him with working voters, white voters, African Americans and Latinos.

“We’re not looking at this as a breakdown of every demographic group and that we have to be where we were in 2008,” Psaki said. “This is a different year than 2008. This country has been through a tough time. All we want to do is get to 270 electoral votes.”

Tight polls aren't worrying Obama campaign

Updated