No pay for play – Is it time to change college sports rules?

Updated
By Alex Stambaugh
Texas A&M University Aggies quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel (2) looks on during an NCAA football practice at the Coolidge Grass...
Texas A&M University Aggies quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel (2) looks on during an NCAA football practice at the Coolidge Grass...
Aaron M. Sprecher/AP

College athletes generate millions of dollars each year for the NCAA through TV and marketing rights, championships and merchandise so why are college athletes not reaping some of these profits?

Texas A&M quarterback and 2012 Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel recently brought the issue to the forefront again after he was suspended from the first half of the season opener for signing autographs that the NCAA worried could have been sold for payment. Meanwhile, Manziel’s jersey continued to be sold online generating profits for the NCAA.

Time magazine’s Sean Gregory joined The Daily Rundown to explain why escalating team revenues and capped scholarships may change the status quo.

“You’ve got one line going up, one line flat lining and how long can we go on with this?” said Gregory. “It’s a question of what’s going to change. Are the schools going to rewrite the rules or are the courts and Congress perhaps going to rewrite the rules?”

Gregory said one alternative could be allowing star athletes to profit from sponsorships, much like amateur Olympic athletes.

“It takes the burden off the school in a way,” said Gregory. “If Johnny Manziel has value in a free market place where other people want to give him money, why shouldn’t that happen?”

Watch Gregory’s full interview with guest host Luke Russert above.

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No pay for play -- Is it time to change college sports rules?

Updated