Morning Rundown

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Libya: The battle over Libya, in addition to posing questions about military tactics, has opened a sort-of second front here at home, where disagreement about U.S. involvement in the mission and the scope of that mission has sharpened every day that Allied airstrikes continue to pound Tripoli without tipping the scales clearly in favor of the opposition (or at least rendering an increasingly defiant Moammar Khaddafy unable to operate).

It is thought this morning that the most likely next outcome in the operation will be a NATO takeover of day-to-day military command, although that would probably not put to bed the broad fears about how to handle a potential stalemate if things drag on.

Japan: In what would otherwise be today’s top story, we learned overnight that Tokyo’s drinking water may contain amounts of radioactive iodine that are unsafe for infants. The U.S. has already banned some imports from the area surrounding the teetering Fukushima nuclear plant and this morning there are unconfirmed reports of black smoke billowing from that hobbled #3 reactor. It’s all happening as the Japanese government estimates the economic toll of the disaster could be well over $300 billion – nearly four times what Hurricane Katrina cost this country.

Mid East protests: We’re also watching more fast-moving developments across the Middle East, particularly protests reportedly turning violent in Syria and more flare-ups in Yemen.

Health care: Today is the one-year anniversary of the health care bill becoming law.

On Daily Rundown: Representative Adam Smith, ranking member on the House Armed Services Committee, joins to talk about U.S. policy in Libya and elsewhere. We’ll also have the latest on the crisis in Japan, where health care reform stands one year later, and the rest of the day’s news.

Morning Rundown

Updated