First Read Flash: Where in the world is Snowden?

Updated
This photo provided by The Guardian Newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the National Security Agency, on Sunday,...
This photo provided by The Guardian Newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the National Security Agency, on Sunday,...
The Guardian/AP Photo

The amazing race. “The whereabouts of National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden were unclear on Monday as heavy security at a Moscow airport fueled speculation that he would attempt to fly to Havana en route to Ecuador. However, journalists aboard Monday morning’s Aeroflot flight to Cuba said there was no sign of Snowden on board,” NBC News reports. “The government of Ecuador earlier confirmed that it was considering asylum application for Snowden, who faces American espionage charges after he admitted to revealing classified documents. He arrived in the Russian capital on Sunday.

The Supremes. The Supreme Court is expected to rule this week on landmark cases on gay marriage and voting rights. SCOTUSblog has more on the pending decisions and will begin liveblogging at 9 am ET.

Paul a ‘no’ on immigration. “Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) said Sunday that the Senate’s bipartisan immigration bill does not do enough to address border security, and he does not plan to support it in its current form,” the Washington Post reports. “ ‘Without some congressional authority and without border security first, I can’t support the final bill,’ Paul said on CNN’s ‘State of The Union.’” NBC News has more on the process the bill faces in the Senate this week.

Hot speech. “Environmentalists who have been prodding President Obama to address climate change get their answer this week,” USA Today reports. “Obama announced via video this weekend that he will deliver a climate change speech Tuesday, outlining ‘a national plan to reduce carbon pollution, prepare our country for the impacts of climate change, and lead global efforts to fight it.’ Obama is expected to announce a series of executive actions to address global warming. Congressional legislation is considered unlikely, given the fact that Republicans control the U.S. House and have enough to mount filibusters in the Senate.”

First Read Flash: Where in the world is Snowden?

Updated