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Stuck between a cliff and a hard place

Stuck between a cliff and a hard place

11/29/12 07:00PM

The National Organization for Women's Terry O’Neill tells The Cycle hosts what women could lose in the battle to find a solution to the fiscal cliff and describes a new solution to the cliff problem that doesn't include a deal or going off the fiscal... watch

Nearing a truce in the war on drugs

Nearing a truce in the war on drugs

11/29/12 07:00PM

With Washington and Colorado voting in November to legalize marijuana, The Cycle hosts discuss if America is nearing a truce in its war on drugs with New York Magazine’s Benjamin Wallace Wells. watch

Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney arrives at the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012, for his luncheon with President Barack Obama. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

President Obama and Romney's lunch date

11/29/12 05:24PM

After six years of campaigning, Mitt Romney finally achieved his dream--sort of. He got to sit down to lunch in the private White House dining room. Unfortunately for him, he was there in the role of guest--or, in other words, loser. President Obama was host; he'll be lunching there for the next four years. This lunch was the first time the two men met face to face since the final presidential debate in October. read more

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Krystal Clear: Come on, y'all

11/29/12 04:40PM

Just listen to that good old-fashioned common sense. You know, really breaks our government problems down for the common man in that classically patronizing yet wholly inaccurate way that politicians seem to excel at. There are a lot of lame talking points out there, but this one probably drives me the most nuts. And while I mostly hear it from Republicans, far too many of my own have fallen for its folksy kitchen table appeal. Here's the problem. read more

UN Ambassador Susan Rice leaves a meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2012, with Sen. Susan Collins, R- Maine, and Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., about the Benghazi terrorist attack. Rice continued her fight Wednesday to win over...

The battle over Susan Rice continues

11/29/12 12:52PM

It has become a battle before a nomination. As the idea of nominating U.S. Ambassador Susan Rice to become secretary of state has been floating around, many GOP senators say they will not support her nomination due to her comments after the September 11th attacks in Benghazi, Libya. On Sunday, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz) said he would be open to speaking with Ambassador Rice over her controversial comments, but based on what we have learned this week, these meetings have not gone as planned. read more

US Capitol building from Senate side

Today on The Cycle: Fiscal Follies

11/29/12 08:02AM

While President Obama and Governor Romney have lunch at the White House today Treasury Secretary Geithner meets with House and Senate leadership on the fiscal cliff trying to move both parties into action. read more

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. pauses as he meet with reporters  on Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012, following a Democratic strategy session.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Steve Speak: Reforming the filibuster won't help

11/28/12 06:44PM

The United States Senate has 100 members, and it used to be that if you could get 51 of them to agree on something, you could pass a bill. Not anymore, though. The magic number today is 60. That’s what you need to break a filibuster, and since 2009, the minority party in the Senate–the Republicans–has insisted on subjecting just about everything Democrats have tried to pass to a filibuster. Major bills, routine legislation, obscure appointments to the federal bench and the executive branch–you name it, Democrats will have well over 50 votes, but not 60, and that will be that. read more

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JFK's complicated father

11/28/12 06:14PM

Father, SEC Chairman, Hollywood movie executive, U.S. Ambassador to Britain, anti-Semite, bootlegger? Not words one hears together often, and definitely not what you'd expect about the patriarch of one of America's most famous political families. But Joseph P. Kennedy earned various titles throughout his life—some deserved, and others debunked in David Nasaw's new book "The Patriarch: The Remarkable Life and Turbulent Times of Joseph P. Kennedy." read more

President Barack Obama gestures as he speaks in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, on the White House campus in Washington, Wednesday  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Today on The Cycle: Balancing Act

11/28/12 12:03PM

Today President Obama pushed Congress to immediately act on one thing that most people on Capitol Hill agree on, to keep the Middle Class tax rates where they currently are. Republicans are starting to show some signs of compromise with the debt talks, with the latest evidence being the defection of several Republicans from the Grover Norquist tax pledge. Many believe that the president has the upper hand this time around. So could this actually be true? read more

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Today on The Cycle: A look into the life of Joseph Patrick Kennedy

11/28/12 08:14AM

David Nasaw joins The Cycle during today’s guest spot to discuss his book The Patriarch: The Remarkable Life and Turbulent Times of Joseph P. Kennedy. David Nasaw is a biographer who wrote the biographies of Andrew Carnegie and William Randolph Hearst. The biography on Joseph Patrick Kennedy shows how Joseph Kennedy was everything from a Hollywood mogul to a stock wizard. He lived through both World Wars, the Great Depression, and the Cold Wars. The biography seeks to clear up the long-held rumors about Joseph Kennedy. read more

Grover Norquist, president of a taxpayer advocacy group, Americans for Tax Reform, meets with millionaires to discuss issues related to the debt supercommittee, Wed., Nov. 16, 2011. (Photo by Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP Photo)

Is Grover Norquist having the best or worst weeks of his life?

11/27/12 05:45PM

Grover Norquist is either having the worst few weeks of his life or the best. It's hard to tell. His anti-tax pledge—and the immense power he's wielded in Washington, D.C., for decades because of it—have become hotly debated topics among Congressional insiders and Hill watchers who wonder if its days are numbered. read more

Courtesy Max Lockie

Congo in Crisis: the media matters

11/27/12 05:45PM

This time last year I was in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. My work with The Carter Center’s Democracy Program landed me in The far-Western province of Bas Congo, a historic chunk of Africa home to the mouth of the Congo river, the ancestral home of the Kongo people, and the origins of European incursion into what would become Africa’s second largest state.  I spent roughly 100 days traveling throughout this region interviewing stakeholders and observing electoral affairs to provide impartial analysis and reporting on the proceedings. read more

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