Washington goes back to work

Updated
President Barack Obama speaks at the ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013.
President Barack Obama speaks at the ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013.
Pablo Martinez Monsivai/AP

President Obama kicks off the first day of his new term today after a historic second inauguration weekend. The 44th president used his inaugural speech to lay out his progressive agenda for the next four years where he defined entitlements, addressed climate change, and made the first mention of gay rights in an inaugural address. President Obama said yesterday, “for our journey is not complete until our wives, our mothers, and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law - for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well.” Thus, President Obama showed he is ready to fight this time around for what he believes in.

While President Obama’s speech made only passing mention of immigration and gun control, two topics that are expected to play starring role in his State of the Union address next month, his inauguration speech did receive praise from both sides.

This week the president is focused on other major issues that are being brought up in Washington including the raising the debt ceiling, which Congress is set to vote on this Wednesday. However, we have already hit the debt ceiling two weeks ago and the Treasury Department has been using “extraordinary measures” to pay our bills ever since.

So what is going to happen? Politico’s Jonathan Allen joins the conversation to discuss everything that is happening in Washington this week from cabinet nominations to Secy. Clinton’s Benghazi testimony to the debt ceiling conversation. See you all at 3 for what is certainly going to be an interesting conversation.

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Washington goes back to work

Updated