The majority’s now the minority when it comes to same-sex marriage

Updated
File photo: signs and line the sidewalks in front of the Capitol Building and the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on Tuesday, March 26, 2013.
File photo: signs and line the sidewalks in front of the Capitol Building and the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. on Tuesday, March 26, 2013.
: Alex Menendez/AP Photo

With the Supreme Court set to rule on DOMA and Prop 8, new polls show movement in the public opinion towards gay marriage.

According to polling by the Pew Research Center, 72% of Americans say that recognition of same-sex marriage is inevitable. This includes 85% of gay marriage supporters and 59% of those who oppose legalizing same-sex marriage.

Part of that shift is that “more people today have gay or lesbian acquaintances,” Pew points out.”which is associated with acceptance of homosexuality and support for gay marriage.” Nine in ten Americans, 87%, say they personally know someone who is gay or lesbian, which is up 61% from 1993, and 49% say a close family member or a close friend is gay or lesbian. This was, in fact, one of the reasons given by Republican Senator Rob Portman when he flipped his stance on the issue.

Religious beliefs are still playing a major role in the opposition. While the number opposed has dropped, 45% of Americans say engaging in homosexual behavior is a sin.

But the opposition that once held a clear majority in this country is now the minority. And with 2.7 million people changing their Facebook profile picture in support of marriage equality, it seems the time is right for a ground-breaking decision out of the courts.

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The majority's now the minority when it comes to same-sex marriage

Updated