The Boston Red Sox help the city heal

Updated
Boston Red Sox's David Ortiz speaks to the crowd before a baseball against the Kansas City Royals in Boston, Saturday, April 20, 2013.
Boston Red Sox's David Ortiz speaks to the crowd before a baseball against the Kansas City Royals in Boston, Saturday, April 20, 2013.
AP Photo/Michael Dwyer

It has been one week since the Boston Marathon bombings. At 2:50 p.m. on Monday, Boston, Washington, and the nation paused for a moment of silence to commemorate when the first bomb exploded. One suspect is dead, a second is in custody and has now been officially charged from his hospital bed. There are 48 other survivors who are still hospitalized; one of the three victims, Krystal Campbell, was laid to rest Monday.

Last Tuesday, Shelly Cohen, of The Boston Herald, said on The Cycle we will “never actually be safe unless we do things that other countries have done, like Israel has done. If we want to have armed guards at every T station for the rest of our natural days. If we want to have armed guards in front of our restaurants and hotels, we can probably be safe or be safer. We are Americans, we are Bostonians, we aren’t going to put up with that for very long.”

One week later, Cohen believes that while in the broadest sense of the word, people may not always be safe, “we feel a little more whole than we did a week ago.” Friday night after Dzhokar Tsarnaev was captured, people rejoiced in the streets and applauded the Boston Police Department. “There have been lots of wonderful moments over the past week in that kind of mindset that we have that we won’t let the terrorists win,” Cohen said. “We won’t let them steal our thunder and our spirit.”

This was apparent on Saturday as the Boston Red Sox played the Kansas City Royals. Prior to the game, in hopes of helping the city heal, a special pre-game ceremony was held to honor the victims. The Fenway faithful were led in their 8th inning anthem of Sweet Caroline by Neil Diamond. Fenway Park “resembles Boston itself where you have an incredible respect for history and tradition,” legendary sportscaster Bob Neumeier said on Monday’s show.  “That stuff that you saw on Saturday certainly played out in light of the experience this week.”

The Boston Red Sox help the city heal

Updated