Photos: In the wake of Hurricane Matthew

  • A policewoman helps to convince a woman to board a bus at the Civic Center in Savannah, Ga., to be evacuated to Augusta, some 130 miles northwest, on Oct. 7, 2016 as Hurricane Matthew approaches. 
  • People look out at the flooded street in front of their home as Hurricane Matthew passes through the area on Oct. 7, 2016 in St Augustine, Fla. 
  • Members of the United Fellowship Ministries International Church hold an impromptu prayer service in the destroyed remains of their church in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew near Nassau, Bahamas, Oct. 7, 2016. 
  • Trees sway from heavy rain and wind from Hurricane Matthew in front of Exploration Tower early Oct. 7, 2016 in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Matthew weakened slightly to a Category 3 storm with maximum sustained winds near 120 mph, but the U.S. National Hurricane Center says it’s expected to remain a powerful hurricane as it moves closer to the coast.
  • Commuters make their way through heavy rain in Jacksonville, Fla., on Oct. 6, 2016, ahead of hurricane Matthew. Some three million people on the US southeast coast faced urgent evacuation Thursday as monstrous Hurricane Matthew bore down for a hit on Florida. 
  • People walk on a street next to destroyed houses after Hurricane Matthew hit Jeremie, Haiti, Oct. 6, 2016.
  • A woman carries a child walking between trees felled by Hurricane Matthew in Les Cayes, Haiti, Oct. 6, 2016.
  • Residents try to put the body of victim of Hurricane Matthew in a coffin in Cavaillon, a district of Les Cayes, Haiti., Oct. 6, 2016. The coordinator for Haiti’s Interior Ministry in the area hit hardest by Hurricane Matthew said the confirmed death toll in that southwestern zone has risen to almost 300. Emmanuel Pierre told The Associated Press that he expects the toll to rise as authorities reach remote places that were left isolated by the storm.
  • Residents repair their home after the passing of Hurricane Matthew, in Sous Roche in Les Cayes, Southwest Haiti, on Oct. 6, 2016. The storm killed at least 108 people in Haiti, the poorest country in the Americas, with the final toll expected to be much higher.
  • Firefighters help an elderly woman recover her clothes from his house destroyed by Hurricane Matthew, in Baracoa, Cuba, Oct. 6, 2016. Leaving more than 100 dead in its wake across the Caribbean, Hurricane Matthew steamed toward heavily populated Florida with terrifying winds of 140 mph.
  • A group of people carry a coffin and try to cross the river La Digue, after the colapse of the only bridge that connects to the south after the passing of hurricane Matthew in the country, in Petit Goave, Haiti, Oct. 5, 2016. The impact of Hurricane Matthew in Haiti, which left at least nine dead and thousands displaced, mainly in southwestern communities, forced the electoral authorities to postpone Sunday’s election.
  • A woman stands in a field of destroyed trees after the passing of Hurricane Matthew, in Sous Roche in Les Cayes, in Southwest Haiti, on Oct. 6, 2016. The storm killed at least 108 people in Haiti, the poorest country in the Americas, with the final toll expected to be much higher.
  • A girl helps her mother to remove mud from her house after Hurricane Matthew flooded their home in Les Cayes, Haiti, Oct. 6, 2016. Two days after the storm rampaged across the country’s remote southwestern peninsula, authorities and aid workers still lack a clear picture of what they fear is the country’s biggest disaster in years.
  • Stanley stands in his destroyed house after the passing of Hurricane Matthew, in Les Cayes, in Southwest Haiti, on Oct. 6, 2016. The storm killed at least 108 people in Haiti, the poorest country in the Americas, with the final toll expected to be much higher.
  • Haitian people cross the river La Digue in Petit Goave where the bridge collapsed during the rains of the Hurricane Matthew, southwest of Port-au-Prince, Oct. 5, 2016. Haiti and the eastern tip of Cuba – blasted by Matthew on October 4, 2016 – began the messy and probably grim task of assessing the storm’s toll. Matthew hit them as a Category Four hurricane but has since been downgraded to three, on a scale of five, by the US National Hurricane Center.
  • People try to cross the overflowing La Rouyonne river in the commune of Leogane, south of Port-au-Prince, Oct. 5, 2016. Haiti and the eastern tip of Cuba – blasted by Matthew on Oct. 4, 2016 – began the messy and probably grim task of assessing the storm’s toll. Matthew hit them as a Category Four hurricane but has since been downgraded to three, on a scale of five, by the US National Hurricane Center. 
  • Residents are evacuated in Fonds Parisiens, western Haiti, Oct. 4, 2016. Hurricane Matthew made landfall on 04 October in western Haiti, causing mudslides and flooding, while two children were reported killed in neighboring Dominican Republic when their family’s house collapsed in the heavy rains from the storm. 
  • Water cascades from the upper floors of a home partially destroyed by the passing of Hurricane Matthew in Baracoa, Cuba, Oct. 5, 2016. The hurricane rolled across the sparsely populated tip of Cuba overnight, destroying dozens of homes in Cuba’s easternmost city, Baracoa, and leaving hundreds of others damaged. 
  • A man reads updates about Hurricane Matthew on his smartphone as he takes shelter in a ballroom of the Melia Hotel overnight in Nassau, Bahamas on Oct. 5, 2016.
  • The high winds and rain of Hurricane Matthew roar over the waterfront of Baracoa, Cuba, Oct. 4, 2016. The dangerous Category 4 storm blew ashore around dawn in Haiti. It unloaded heavy rain as it swirled on toward a lightly populated part of Cuba and the Bahamas.
  • People walk on the road as rain falls during Hurricane Matthew in Les Cayes, Haiti, Oct. 4, 2016.
  • In this Oct. 4, 2016 photo, a family heads to a shelter in Leogane, Haiti. Hurricane Matthew mashed concrete walls, flattened palm trees and tore off roofs, forcing thousands of Haitians to flee. Two days later, authorities and aid workers were just beginning to get a clear picture of what they fear is the country’s biggest disaster in years.
  • A girl watches as authorities arrive to evacuate people from her house in Tabarre, Haiti, Oct. 3, 2016. The center of Hurricane Matthew is expected to pass near or over southwestern Haiti on Tuesday, but the area is already experiencing rain from the outer bands of the storm.

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As the now category three Hurricane Matthew continues to crawl up the Atlantic, along the eastern Florida coastline, the state’s hurricane warning has been extended into North Carolina.

The storm, with winds down from 145 MPH to 120 MPH, and with 150 MPH gusts, is currently 37 miles off Daytona Beach, where storm surge flooding is bringing water inland. Since starting to affect the state on Thursday, the hurricane has left more than half a million Florida residents without power, and there are fears that heavy rainfall combined with a storm surge could trigger major flooding along the coasts of Georgia and South Carolina.

In Florida, a state of emergency remains in place as some three million people have been ordered to evacuate. Forecasters say more than 15 inches of rain could still cause a 9ft storm surge in the state. Meanwhile, MSNBC is reporting, there are claims of price gouging from those who have evacuated, saying motels, gas stations, and stores have raised prices.

Before making its way up to the U.S. earlier this week, Hurricane Matthew decimated Baracoa, a city on the eastern tip of Cuba, in the Guantánamo Province. It then made a hard landfall over Haiti on Monday night, into Tuesday. There, the city of Jeremie is said to be 80% leveled and 30,000 homes were destroyed in Sud Province.

According to the World Food Programme’s director in Haiti, Carlos Veloso, it’s believed that the highest number of deaths is in the country’s south-western peninsula—an area that has been largely cut off by land, though some aid has started to make it’s way in via helicopter. Reuters has placed the death toll at 478, but Veloso has warned that the number could rise in the next few days, as emergency crews are able to make their way into the area. The U.S. has sent nine Army and Marine Corps helicopters to Haiti, to determine which areas need the most help, before delivering aid.

Hurricane Matthew also battered the Bahamas, though there were no deaths, and the Dominican Republic, which has reported four deaths.  

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