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Friday's Campaign Round-Up, 6.9.17

06/09/17 12:00PM

Today's installment of campaign-related news items from across the country.

* Just hours after James Comey wrapped up his public testimony on Capitol Hill yesterday, the Republican National Committee used the Senate hearing as the basis for a new fundraising appeal.

* In Georgia's congressional special election, an Atlanta Journal-Constitution poll released this morning found Jon Ossoff (D) leading Karen Handel (R), 51% to 44%. The election is June 20, which is a week from Tuesday.

* A separate poll from WSB in Atlanta, also released yesterday, showed Ossoff with a narrower, two-point advantage over Handel. Both surveys were conducted after the candidates' debate earlier this week.

* In Kansas, Secretary of State Kris Kobach (R), who's gained national notoriety as a fierce opponent of voting rights and undocumented immigrants, announced yesterday he hopes to succeed Sam Brownback as the state's next governor.

* With time running out in Virginia's competitive Democratic gubernatorial primary, the editorial board of the Washington Post published an endorsement this week for Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam. Primary Day is Tuesday, June 13.

* In New Hampshire, New England's most competitive electoral battleground, Republican control of the state government has led to new voting restrictions.

* Alabama's John Archibald, an AL.com columnist who's been a TRMS guest several times, suggested yesterday that Attorney General Jeff Sessions is having so many troubles, he should consider stepping down and running for the Senate seat he just vacated. I think Archibald was only half-kidding.

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Image: US-POLITICS-TRUMP-ORDER

New polling shows Trump's standing slipping to new lows

06/09/17 11:20AM

Given some of the fundamentals of domestic current events -- most notably the lowest unemployment rate in over a decade -- it's tempting to assume a new president would enjoy reasonably strong public support right now.

That's clearly not the case with this new president.

President Donald Trump did something illegal in his relationship with Russia, 31 percent of American voters say, while another 29 percent say he did something unethical, but not illegal, according to a Quinnipiac University national poll released today. The president did nothing wrong, 32 percent of voters say.

President Trump's campaign advisors did something illegal in dealing with Russia, 40 percent of voters say, as 25 percent say they did something unethical but not illegal and 24 percent say they did nothing wrong.

The president's job approval rating dips to a new low, a negative 34 - 57 percent, compared to a negative 37 - 55 percent in a May 24 survey by [from Quinnipiac].

Quinnipiac's Tim Malloy said in the report, "There is zero good news for President Donald Trump in this survey, just a continual slide into a chasm of doubt about his policies and his very fitness to serve."

And while this is obviously just one poll, it's not out of step with several other recent surveys that also show the president's approval rating below the 40 percent threshold. FiveThirtyEight's polling aggregator, which creates averages based on publicly available data, puts Trump's current standing at 38.3 percent -- the lowest point to date in his brief tenure.

At a certain level, all of this may seem routine. After all, Trump's unpopularity isn't exactly a new phenomenon. But the president finds himself in circumstances that are starting to resemble a crisis.

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Republican members of the House and House Select Committee on Benghazi Chairman Trey Gowdy react after the election for the Speaker of the House was thrown into chaos on Capitol Hill, Oct. 8, 2015. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty)

Despite last year's embarrassing missteps, Gowdy gets a promotion

06/09/17 10:41AM

Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) intended to use his chairmanship of the House Oversight Committee to great effect in this Congress, right up until he decided to walk away from his job a year and a half early. The reasons for the Utah Republican's dramatic change of heart have never been fully explained.

Nevertheless, Chaffetz's departure -- his last day is June 30 -- created a new opportunity for another House Republican to become the chair of a powerful and high-profile committee. Yesterday, as the Washington Post reported, GOP leaders officially announced Chaffetz's successor.

Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) is set to take over as chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, a post that carries broad authority to investigate President Trump and the executive branch.

The House Republican Steering Committee voted Thursday to hand the gavel to Gowdy, according to statements issued by Gowdy and House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.).

If Gowdy's name sounds familiar, it may be because Donald Trump recently considered him to serve as the new director of the FBI -- before the South Carolina congressman withdrew from consideration.

Or maybe you know Gowdy for that other thing he's famous for.

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Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., speaks during a news conference, May 23, 2013, in Washington.

McCaskill uses facts to slam Senate Republicans' health care process

06/09/17 10:22AM

Many of us tuned in to watch yesterday's Senate Intelligence Committee hearing with former FBI Director James Comey's sworn testimony, but around the same time, there were a few fireworks in a lower-profile hearing in the same building.

HHS Secretary Tom Price testified yesterday before the Senate Finance Committee on his department's budget, and not surprisingly, there was a fair amount of discussion of the Republican plans on health care policy. Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) asked the committee's chairman, Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), whether the panel would hold any hearings on the GOP's proposal.

The Utah Republican, apparently unsure how to respond, had an aide whisper a talking point in his ear. Hatch eventually told McCaskill that he doesn't know if the committee would hold a hearing on the still-secret legislation, but Democrats had been invited to "give your ideas" about the issue.

McCaskill wasn't having it.

"No, that's not true, Mr. Chairman. Let me just say, I watched carefully all of the hearings that went on [when the Affordable Care Act was crafted]. I was not a member of this committee at the time, although I would have liked to be. [Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa] was the ranking member. Dozens of Republican amendments were offered and accepted in that hearing process.

"And when you say that you're inviting us -- and we heard you, Mr. Secretary, just say, 'We'd love your support' -- for what? We don't even know. We have no idea what's being proposed. There's a group of guys in a back room somewhere that are making these decisions. There were no hearings in the House.

"I mean, listen, this is hard to take. Because I know we made mistakes [when the ACA came together], Mr. Secretary. And one of the criticisms we got over and over again that the vote was partisan. Well you couldn't have a more partisan exercise than what you're engaged in right now. We're not even going to have a hearing on a bill that impacts one-sixth of our economy. We're not going to have an opportunity to offer a single amendment. It is all being done with an eye to try to get it by with 50 votes and the vice president.

"I am stunned that that's what [Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell] would call regular order, which he sanctimoniously said would be the order of the day when the Republicans took the Senate over. We are now so far from regular order that the newer members don't even know what it looks like."

The Missouri Democrat pleaded with Hatch to be given the same opportunities Republicans had during the process in which the ACA was written.

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A man carries an umbrella in the rain as he passes the New York Stock Exchange on Oct. 16, 2014.

Away from the national spotlight, GOP guts Wall Street safeguards

06/09/17 09:20AM

As much of the country probably noticed, it was a rather dramatic day on Capitol Hill yesterday. The former director of the FBI gave sworn testimony to the Senate Intelligence Committee, suggesting the president of the United States may have obstructed justice. The hearing generated quite a bit of attention, and for good reason: Donald Trump's presidency is facing a genuine crisis.

But on the other side of Capitol Hill, House Republicans were only too pleased to take advantage of the fact that their latest moves unfolded far from the national spotlight.

The House of Representatives on Thursday approved a bill that would roll back key parts of the Dodd-Frank act aimed at Wall Street and financial industry regulatory reform which was passed in the wake of the mortgage meltdown.

The House voted 233-186 to approve the Financial CHOICE Act.

There was discussion in some circles last year that both parties are more or less the same when it comes to doing Wall Street's bidding, but pay close attention to the roll call on yesterday's vote: of the 234 House Republicans who voted on the bill, 233 (99.6%) of the GOP members voted for it. In contrast, of the 185 House Democrats who voted yesterday, literally all of them opposed the bill.

And what a bill it is. As regular readers may recall from our coverage a month ago, the point of this legislation is to gut most of the Wall Street reforms created in the wake of the 2008 crash. The Dodd-Frank law, which established a series of safeguards and layers of accountability, has drawn fierce opposition from Republicans and their allied lobbyists from the financial industry, and this bill is the vehicle GOP officials have embraced to roll back the clock. As the New York Times explained:

The Choice Act would exempt some financial institutions that meet capital and liquidity requirements from many of Dodd-Frank's restrictions that limit risk taking. It would also replace Dodd-Frank's method of dealing with large and failing financial institutions, known as the orderly liquidation authority — which critics say reinforces the idea that some banks are too big to fail — with a new bankruptcy code provision.

In addition, the legislation would weaken the powers of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Under the proposed law, the president could fire the agency's director at will and its oversight powers would be curbed.

The bill would also eliminate the Labor Department's fiduciary rule, which requires brokers to act in the best interest of their clients when providing investment advice about retirement. The first parts of the rule are scheduled to go into effect on Friday.

Marcus Stanley, policy director for Americans for Financial Reform, recently told Vox, "It's a little hard to get your mind around everything this bill does, because there's almost no area of financial regulation it doesn't touch. There's a bunch of very radical stuff in this bill, and it goes way beyond repealing Dodd-Frank."

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Trump sets up a contest of credibility he simply cannot win

06/09/17 08:42AM

The list of Donald Trump falsehoods exposed by former FBI Director James Comey over the last two days isn't short.

Trump was asked on Fox News last month whether he ever asked Comey for his loyalty. Trump responded, "No, I didn't." Trump was asked at a White House press conference last month, "Did you at any time urge former FBI Director James Comey in any way, shape, or form to close or to back down the investigation into Michael Flynn?" Trump replied, "No. No. Next question."

Trump was asked by NBC News' Lester Holt about the private dinner he had with Comey, and the president said Comey "asked for the dinner." Trump said Comey had called him on the phone in the weeks that followed to tell the president he wasn't under investigation. Trump said Comey was fired in part because FBI personnel had "lost confidence" in the bureau's director.

Each of these claims now appears to be a brazen lie the president told the American public.

But wait, Republicans will argue, we don't know for sure that Trump was lying. What we have here is a "he said, he said" dispute. For all we know, the GOP argument goes, perhaps Comey's claims are untrue and the president has been completely honest.

And while that may make the White House and its allies feel better, this posture isn't quite right.

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Image: U.S. President Trump listens to  Speaker Ryan as he gathers with Republican House members after healthcare bill vote at the White House in Washington

Trump's allies point to his ignorance and inexperience as a defense

06/09/17 08:00AM

As Donald Trump's Russia scandal has intensified, and evidence of alleged obstruction of justice has mounted, the president's allies have argued repeatedly that the Republican did not do what he's accused of doing. The allegations, the right has insisted, are wrong.

This week, the party line changed. Maybe he did do some of those things, Trump's defenders have begun arguing, but it's just because he's so ignorant.

Here, for example, is what House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) told reporters yesterday:

"[O]f course there needs to be a degree of independence between DOJ, FBI, and a White House and a line of communications established. The president is new at this, he is new to government, and so he probably wasn't steeped in the long running protocols that establish the relationships between DOJ, FBI, and White Houses. He is just new to this."

It's an increasingly common argument. Rep. Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.) said yesterday, "It has to still be legal and right and all that, but I think a lot of it is -- he's used to being the CEO."

Here's a tip for political professionals: if your argument begins, "It has to still be legal and right and all that, but..." stop and think of something else.

Regardless, this entire tack is bizarre. It's as if some on the right want Americans to believe we elected an ignorant television personality to lead the executive branch of a global superpower, and if he started ignoring the rule of law shortly after taking office, it's only because he's a fool, not a criminal.

And that's supposed to be the defense of the president.

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Thursday's Mini-Report, 6.8.17

06/08/17 05:30PM

Today's edition of quick hits:

* More on this tomorrow: "The House on Thursday voted to free Wall Street from many of the strict constraints put in place after the 2008 financial crisis, the opening salvo in what is likely to be a protracted battle over deregulation of the powerful banking industry."

* North Korea "fired several suspected short-range anti-ship missiles off its east coast Thursday, South Korea's military said, in a continuation of defiant launches as it seeks to build a nuclear missile capable of reaching the continental United States."

* The U.S. State Department's statement was far more diplomatic: "Iran's foreign minister rejected Donald Trump's condolences Thursday after a pair of ISIS-claimed attacks in Tehran, calling the president's words 'repugnant.'"

* An unpredictable British election: "Polling stations opened across the U.K. early Thursday in an election dominated by looming Brexit negotiations and recent deadly terror attacks."

* Reality Leigh Winner: "The intelligence industry contractor who is accused of giving journalists a highly classified report about Russian interference in the U.S. election will plead not guilty, her lawyer told NBC News on Wednesday."

* This jail falls under the purview of David A. Clarke Jr: "A federal jury Wednesday awarded $6.7 million to a woman who was raped repeatedly by a guard when she was being held in the Milwaukee County Jail four years ago."

* The White House probably didn't expect pushback on this: "As President Donald Trump aligns with Saudi Arabia amid a fresh dispute among Gulf nations, senators in both parties as soon as Thursday will try to block him from selling more than $500 million in offensive weapons to Riyadh."

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Image: US-POLITICS-CONGRESS-INTELLIGENCE

FBI's Comey raises the stakes in Trump's Russia scandal

06/08/17 01:59PM

It was a day much of the political world had circled on its calendar, and for good reason. As the investigation into Donald Trump's Russia scandal intensifies, former FBI Director James Comey gave sworn testimony this morning before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

And what, pray tell, did we learn? Quite a bit, actually.

1. Comey thinks Trump is a liar. Comey's opening statement called out Trump for making "plain and simple" lies about the FBI, and his testimony made multiple references to Comey's concerns about the president's habit of dishonesty, including the explanation about his contemporaneous memos: "I was honestly concerned that he might lie about the nature of our meeting."

This may not have been surprising on a substantive level, but to hear a former FBI director give sworn testimony that the president cannot be trusted to tell the truth struck me as amazing.

2. Obstruction. Asked about Trump's possible obstruction of justice, which seems more obvious now than ever, Comey twice said that was up to the special counsel, saying it's a question Bob Mueller and his team "will work toward." I'd love some additional clarity: did that mean the special counsel could explore alleged obstruction or is already in the process of investigating alleged obstruction?

Also note, Comey said Trump's request about the investigation into Mike Flynn is of "investigative interest" to the FBI, which probably isn't what the White House wanted to hear.

3. Consider the partisan wagons circled. Those hoping Senate Republicans might eventually break with the White House's preferred script will apparently have to wait for some other day. GOP senators didn't defend Trump, per se, but their questions once again proved that tribal loyalties outweigh practically every other consideration, Trump's 34% approval rating be damned.

4. Comey made news about Sessions. One of the questions that emerged yesterday is why Comey assumed Attorney General Jeff Sessions would have to recuse himself from the Russia investigation. Comey testified today that Sessions' role would've been "problematic" for reasons the former FBI director couldn't discuss publicly. That's a big deal.

5. Collusion. Does Comey believe Trump colluded with Russia? "It's a question I don't think I should answer in an open setting," he replied. Leaving that open-ended seemed to catch everyone by surprise, and for good reason.

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Launched in 2008, “The Rachel Maddow Show” follows the machinations of policy making in America, from local political activism to international diplomacy. Rachel Maddow looks past the distractions of political theater and stunts and focuses on the legislative proposals and policies that shape American life - as well as the people making and influencing those policies and their ultimate outcome, intended or otherwise.

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