Turning the gun-buyback model on its ear

Updated
 
Turning the gun-buyback model on its ear
Turning the gun-buyback model on its ear
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I’m not an expert in gun buyback programs, but the basic idea seems pretty straightforward. In the hopes of getting more guns off the streets, there are organized events in which members of the public bring their firearms, and exchange them for cash. They’re usually publicly funded, though as Rachel noted on the show in March, some are privately financed.

But what matters is the point of the programs: removing guns from circulation. It’s possible Arizona Republicans find this confusing.

Arizona cities and counties that hold community gun buyback events will have to sell the surrendered weapons instead of destroying them under a bill Gov. Jan Brewer signed into law Monday.

The bill was championed by Republicans in the GOP-controlled Legislature who argued that municipalities were skirting a 2010 law that was tightened last year and requires police to sell seized weapons to federally licensed dealers. They argued that destroying property turned over to the government is a waste of taxpayer resources.

Hmm. Let’s say a local sheriff’s office in Arizona wants to reduce gun violence in its community by getting more guns off the streets. The sheriff decides to do this through a gun buyback program, encouraging local citizens to participate in exchange for money, helping to keep weapons out of the hands of children and criminals. The guns are then destroyed.

Under a new law championed by state Republicans, however, that sheriff’s office can’t destroy the guns – the firearms collected during the buyback will instead be brought to gun stores, where than can be sold and put back on the streets.

The Arizona GOP wants to turn gun buyback programs into gun recycling programs – watch the assault rifle go from the street … to the police … to the gun dealers … back to the street.

Let’s all marvel at the cycle of life, or more accurately in this case, death.

Jan Brewer and Arizona

Turning the gun-buyback model on its ear

Updated