Tuesday’s Mini-Report, 6.10.14

Today’s edition of quick hits:
 
* Afghanistan: “Five American Special Operations service members and at least one Afghan soldier were killed when a United States Air Force B-1 bomber unleashed an airstrike on their position in southern Afghanistan, in one of the deadliest instances of friendly fire in more than a decade of war, Afghan and American officials said Tuesday. Investigators were looking into possible causes, including faulty coordinates, an errant bomb or other human error.”
 
* Iraqi army soldiers “abandoned their weapons and fled the northern Iraqi city of Mosul on Tuesday, as Sunni militants freed hundreds of prisoners and seized military bases, police stations, banks, the airport and the provincial governor’s headquarters. The attacks widened the Sunni insurgency in Iraq and were among the most audacious assaults on the government since the American military withdrawal more than two years ago.”
 
* More details out of Oregon, where two people were shot and killed, including the alleged gunman: “Troutdale Police Chief Scott Anderson said at an afternoon news conference that one teacher suffered non-life threatening injuries and was treated at the scene. None of the casualties involved have been publicly identified.”
 
* Democratic Rep. Earl Blumenauer: “An Oregon lawmaker said he hoped a school shooting that took place Tuesday morning in a town he represents would spur action in Congress on gun control.”
 
* Immigration: “The Senate on Tuesday reached a deal to provide almost $2 billion in funds to pay for a huge influx of child migrants streaming across the Mexico border. The move comes amid growing concern over the massive rise in illegal young migrants, with the Obama administration saying that 47,000 children have been caught crossing the border since October of 2013.”
 
* While the House won’t pass some bills at all, it will pass some bills twice: “The House on Tuesday twice passed legislation to allow veterans to seek medical care outside the Department of Veterans Affairs if wait times are too long. Passed the second time 426-0, the bill would require the VA to pay for enrolled veterans’ medical care from private doctors if they cannot get appointments within the department’s wait time goals.”
 
* House GOP leaders had promised to do the exact opposite: “The Republican-led House will reach a dubious milestone this week: It will enter the record books as the most gagged in American history. The House Rules Committee on Tuesday plans to approve two more ‘closed rules’ for debate – a procedure to block lawmakers from offering amendments on the House floor – bringing the total in the current Congress to 62.”
 
* Green Mountain State: “The legislation will raise Vermont’s minimum wage from $8.73 an hour, already almost a dollar above the federal minimum, to $9.60 in 2016, $10 in 2017 and $10.50 in 2018. Beginning in 2019, the minimum wage will be indexed to inflation.”
 
* California: “A Los Angeles Superior Court judge ruled Tuesday that tenure, seniority and other job protections for teachers have created unequal conditions in public schools and deprive poor children of the best teachers.”
 
* The Washington Post ran a headline this morning that read, “One way to end violence against women? Stop taking lovers and get married.” First, if you’ve urging women to change their behavior as a response to assaults, you’re doing it wrong. Second, after George Will’s column yesterday, the Post’s editors really need to give this subject some additional thought.
 
Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.

Tuesday's Mini-Report, 6.10.14