Tuesday’s Campaign Round-Up, 9.30.14

Updated
Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that won’t necessarily generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers:
 
* Massachusetts’ gubernatorial race has suddenly become one of the nation’s most competitive. A new Suffolk poll shows Martha Coakley (D) and Charlie Baker (R) tied at 43% each, while a Western New England University poll shows Baker up by one, 44% to 43%.
 
* A new statewide poll in Michigan shows its gubernatorial race every bit as close, with incumbent Gov. Rick Snyder (R) up by one over Rep. Mark Schauer (D), 41% to 40%.
 
* The same poll shows Rep. Gary Peters (D) leading Terri Lynn Land (R) in Michigan’s U.S. Senate race by double digits, 48% to 38%.
 
* And speaking of Land, NPR reported this morning that Land, despite being just 35 days from the election, literally hasn’t made any public appearances in the last seven days (thanks to Ron Chusid for the heads-up).
 
* NARAL Pro-Choice America is launching a six-figure direct-mail campaign this week, targeting three incumbent Republican governors: Wisconsin’s Scott Walker, Florida’s Rick Scott, and Kansas’ Sam Brownback. The message: these governors are “obsessed with outlawing abortion” instead of focusing on jobs and the economy.
 
* In a year featuring several three-way contests, let’s not forget about the U.S. Senate race in South Dakota, where a new statewide poll shows Mike Rounds (R) leading Rick Weiland (D) by 13 points, 39% to 26%, because former Sen. Larry Pressler, who was a Republican but is now running as an independent, has 24% support. [Update: math corrected.]
 
* The far-right Club for Growth usually devoted its election-year resources to helping Republicans, but this week, it’s going after Rep. Vance McAllister (R) in his Louisiana district.
 
* And in Tennessee’s U.S. Senate race, it looks like we can add Democratic candidate Gordon Ball to the list of those caught up in online plagiarism controversies. Ball is considered a heavy underdog to Sen. Lamar Alexander (R), and this won’t help.
 

Tuesday's Campaign Round-Up, 9.30.14

Updated