Thursday’s Mini-Report, 5.5.16

Today’s edition of quick hits:
 
* Canada: “Fast-moving wildfires spread farther across the Alberta oil sands region on Thursday, forcing the evacuation of three more communities south of Fort McMurray and the work camps north of the city. Thousands of people who fled the flames earlier in the week had to evacuate for the second time in three days.”
 
* North Carolina: “[State] House Speaker Tim Moore said Thursday that legislators won’t meet the U.S. Department of Justice’s Monday deadline to repeal or stop enforcing House Bill 2.”
 
* FDA: “The Food and Drug Administration, for the first time, imposed far-reaching regulations on e-cigarettes, cigars and other tobacco products, requiring manufacturers to disclose their ingredients and submit their products for government approval, and barring retailers from selling the items to anyone under 18 years old.”
 
* Brazil’s scandalized system continues to spiral: “A Brazilian Supreme Court justice ruled on Thursday that Eduardo Cunha, the powerful lawmaker who orchestrated the effort to impeach President Dilma Rousseff, must step down because he is facing a corruption trial.”
 
* Commutations: “President Obama commuted the sentences of 58 federal prisoners convicted of drug crimes, the White House announced Thursday. Eighteen of the inmates were serving life sentences, mostly on crack- or cocaine-related charges. Most will be released on Sept. 2, but some will be freed early next year.”
 
* Turkey’s prime minister “resigned Thursday after a public rift with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, throwing the country’s politics into turmoil and paving the way for Erdogan to consolidate power at a time of domestic and regional crises.”
 
* A case out of Iowa we’ve been watching: “Federal jurors have returned guilty verdicts in a host of public corruption charges brought against three former Ron Paul presidential campaign aides accused of a secret plot to pay an Iowa state senator $73,000 for his endorsement.”
 
* Afghanistan: “The sad state of [Afghan] soldiers’ boots highlights something that U.S. military officials have known for about two years: Despite more than $68 billion in U.S. funding for Afghan security forces over the past 14 years, they still can’t even clothe themselves.”
 
Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.
 
 
 

Thursday's Mini-Report, 5.5.16