The fiendishly clever White House

Updated
 
The fiendishly clever White House
The fiendishly clever White House

After losing dozens of advertisers, Rush Limbaugh has largely decided to direct his attention away from Georgetown law student Sandra Fluke – indeed, the host seems to have picked a new target – but some of Limbaugh’s allies aren’t quite ready to move on.

Fox News host Eric Bolling speculated on Tuesday that Sandra Fluke, the law student who has become famous for being attacked by Rush Limbaugh, was part of an elaborate White House plan to distract voters from the economy. […]

President Obama and his “allies in the press” were “trying to pull a fast one on you,” he said. Calling Fluke a “foot soldier” for the White House, he added, “President Obama, on the ropes with the economy and specifically with women voters, gets Mrs. Fluke to create a controversy, and the liberal media puppets play along as scripted.”

One of Bolling’s Fox News co-hosts agreed, scoffing at “anyone who thinks this was accidental,” and adding, “This was very purposeful and specific.”

I’ve watched the clip; I’ve read the transcript; and I still haven’t the foggiest idea what these folks are even trying to say.

As Bolling sees it, the Obama White House recruited Fluke “to create a controversy.” Those dastardly fiends in the West Wing must be incredibly clever at setting traps, because it wasn’t the president’s idea to have Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) reject Fluke as a witness, and it certainly wasn’t Obama’s idea to have Rush Limbaugh call the young woman a “slut” and a “prostitute,” followed by a request for a sex tape for Limbaugh to watch.

How was the White House able to see into the future, knowing weeks in advance how Republicans would respond to an unknown witness at a House committee hearing? Apparently, we’re supposed to believe that Obama and his team are just that good.

“This was very purposeful and specific”? What was very purposeful and specific? I can’t figure out what “this” even refers to.

On “The Ed Show” last night, Ed Schultz called Bolling’s argument “moronic.” That’s as good a description as any.

The fiendishly clever White House

Updated