Monday’s Mini-Report, 9.15.14

Updated
Today’s edition of quick hits:
 
* Awkward diplomacy: “Secretary of State John Kerry said on Monday that the Obama administration would keep the door open to confidential communications with Iran on the security crisis in Iraq, despite sarcastic criticism from Iran’s supreme leader, who said the American plan for bombing Islamic militants, their common enemy, was absurd.”
 
* NATO: “The pledge of 26 foreign ministers in Paris today to combat the self-declared Islamic State with ‘all means necessary’ gives an important boost to the international efforts to dismantle the militant group that is imposing its will on large parts of Syria and Iraq.”
 
* Climate crisis: “This past August was the warmest since records began in 1881, according to new data released by NASA. The latest readings continue a series of record or near-record breaking months. May of this year was also the warmest in recorded history.”
 
* A White House petition for a proposed “Mike Brown Law,” which would requires “all state, county, and local police to wear a camera,” received enough signatures to guarantee a formal reply. Roy L. Austin, Jr., the Deputy Assistant to the President for the Office of Urban Affairs, published a response over the weekend.
 
* Decades later: “Retired Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. Adkins stood ramrod straight on Monday as President Obama draped the Medal of Honor around his neck at the White House. It had been nearly five decades since he led Special Forces soldiers through a bloody ordeal that spanned a week in March 1966, but he still wore a crisp Army uniform, and saluted after receiving the nation’s top award for combat valor. Adkins, 80, was one of two Vietnam War soldiers awarded the Medal of Honor in a ceremony at the White House.”
 
* Look for more on this fun one on tonight’s show: “The U.S. Senate has for years lived by a secret book of rules that governs everything from how many sheets of paper and potted plants each Senate office is allotted to when Senators can use taxpayer money to charter planes or boats. The document has never been available to the public – until now.”
 
* GM: “General Motors Co will pay compensation for 19 deaths linked to a faulty ignition switch, according to the lawyer overseeing the process, more than the 13 deaths the automaker had previously admitted [to] were caused by the now recalled part.”
 
* More on this tomorrow: “No matter what the electorate decides in seven weeks, Obama has already succeeded in his bid to refashion the bench – and the nuclear option has played a significant role.”
 
* I didn’t think Rep. Mark Sanford’s (R-S.C.) personal life could get any messier. I stand corrected.
 
* And if you’ve missed Rachel talking about it on the show, we’ve been updating an online whip count, listing the members of Congress who support a congressional debate and vote on authorizing force against ISIS targets. Have your representatives weighed in? If so, and their names aren’t on our list, email us at Rachel@msnbc.com.
 
Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.
 

Monday's Mini-Report, 9.15.14

Updated