Monday’s Mini-Report, 8.1.16

Today’s edition of quick hits:
 
* ISIS: “The U.S. launched a new campaign of airstrikes Monday aimed at dislodging ISIS from its stronghold in Libya. The ‘precision airstrikes’ were launched in support of Libyan government forces (GNA) that are attempting to drive ISIS from Sirte, a city halfway between Tripoli and Benghazi, the Pentagon and Libya’s official government confirmed.”
 
* Zika: “The Florida Department of Health has identified 10 more people who likely contracted Zika virus through a mosquito bite, Governor Rick Scott said Monday – bringing the total number of people with locally transmitted Zika to 14. Pregnant women are advised to avoid travel to the area just north of downtown Miami, health officials said.”
 
* Afghanistan: “A powerful explosion shook Kabul, the Afghan capital, in the early hours of Monday, and Taliban militants claimed that they had targeted a heavily guarded guesthouse for foreign contractors on the outskirts of the city.”
 
* BLM: “The Movement for Black Lives – under the catch-all banner of the Black Lives Matter movement – has put together what it describes as a ‘clear vision of the world where black humanity and dignity is the reality.’”
 
* The latest mass shooting: “A manhunt was underway in Austin after a gunman opened fire on a crowded downtown street as bars were closing Sunday, killing one person and wounding four others, police said.”
 
* Nebraska: “A sex tape scandal has created a political storm in Nebraska. Republican state Sen. Bill Kintner, reported to be one of the most conservative lawmakers in Nebraska and a politician who frequently touts Christian morality, has been accused of keeping and possibly sending a sex video of himself from his state computer, prompting calls for his resignation.”
 
* Veterans: “President Barack Obama is touting strides in reducing homelessness among military veterans as his administration reaches the halfway point in building a massive database on veterans’ health.”
 
* Unfortunate timing in Texas: “Half a century ago, a sniper perched on a University of Texas tower unleashed a killing spree that left 16 dead, and for the first time since then the school will hold an official memorial for an event that shocked the nation. But overshadowing the anniversary of the Aug. 1, 1966, tower shooting is the start of a new law backed by Republican lawmakers to allow more guns in more places at public universities.”
 
Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.
 
 
 

Monday's Mini-Report, 8.1.16