Monday’s Mini-Report, 3.30.15

Today’s edition of quick hits:
 
* P5+1 talks: “The U.S. and other world powers and Iran met Monday in a final push to reach an interim nuclear deal – with one foreign minister saying there had been ‘some progress and some setbacks’ as a deadline loomed in the negotiations.”
 
* The latest sticking point: “For months, Iran tentatively agreed that it would send a large portion of its stockpile of uranium to Russia, where it would not be accessible for use in any future weapons program. But on Sunday Iran’s deputy foreign minister made a surprise comment to Iranian reporters, ruling out an agreement that involved giving up a stockpile that Iran has spent years and billions of dollars to amass.”
 
* A deadly scene: “An NSA police officer opened fire Monday morning when two men dressed as women and driving a stolen car tried to ram through the gates at Fort Meade – and one suspect was killed, sources said. After trying to make an ‘unauthorized entry,’ the driver of the Ford Escape ignored the guard’s order to leave the area, NSA spokesman Jonathan Freed said in a statement.”
 
* Missouri: “Veteran Missouri state official Spence Jackson, who was media director for the late state auditor Tom Schweich, was found dead Sunday, sources said. He was 44. A source told the Post-Dispatch his death was being investigated as a suicide.”
 
* I’m not convinced the Speaker knows what “reprehensible“ means: “House Speaker John Boehner, who is traveling to Israel during the congressional recess this week, called the Obama administration’s treatment of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu ‘reprehensible.’”
 
* This was a dumb case: “The Supreme Court on Monday declined to take up the latest lawsuit against Obamacare, this time a challenge to a board that critics label a ‘death panel.’”
 
* Why is Indiana’s right-to-discriminate law different from the federal RFRA? “The new statute’s defenders claim it simply mirrors existing federal rules, but it contains two provisions that put new obstacles in the path of equality.”
 
* She was the only remaining credible rival: “Having won the backing of the entire leadership team, New York’s Charles E. Schumer might become the next Senate Democratic leader by acclamation. Conference Secretary Patty Murray, D-Wash., has joined in endorsing Schumer for the top job when Nevada Democrat Harry Reid retires at the beginning of 2017.”
 
* Payback? “Speaker John A. Boehner has repeatedly said he doesn’t believe in retribution against the GOP lawmakers who didn’t vote for him to be speaker. But he increasingly seems to believe he doesn’t exactly have to reward those members either. Rep. Louie Gohmert, a member who has made no secret of his opposition to many of Boehner’s plans, has found himself kicked off two upcoming congressional trips during the House’s two week recess.”
 
* Seriously? “In a bizarre email, businessman and heavyweight conservative donor Foster Friess demanded that the Washington Post ‘scrub’ its story on a misogynistic email chain connected to Daily Caller editor Tucker Carlson.”
 
* A case worth watching: “The Colorado Attorney General’s Office on Friday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to throw out a lawsuit filed by Nebraska and Oklahoma that contends Colorado’s legalization of marijuana is causing an increase in drug crimes in their states.”
 
* An Arkansas woman told a reporter she’d benefit from an increase in the minimum wage. Her boss saw the article that quoted her and reportedly fired her on the spot.
 
* Welcome to the medium, Ben: “Former Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke is getting a new title – blogger.”
 
Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.
 

Monday's Mini-Report, 3.30.15