Monday’s Campaign Round-Up, 7.9.18

Today’s installment of campaign-related news items from across the country.

* In a Washington Post-Schar School poll published late last week, Democrats led Republicans on the generic congressional ballot, 47% to 37%.

* Voters in Michigan successfully put an anti-gerrymandering proposal on the state’s November ballot, but the Michigan Supreme Court announced on Friday it will consider a legal challenge to the proposal. Let’s note for context that of the seven justices on the state’s high court, five were appointed by Republican governors.

* For the first time since the Affordable Care Act became law in 2010, Democratic candidates are now running more health care ads than Republicans.

* It took a month, but California has just about finished tallying its primary ballots, and as the Washington Post  noted, we now know that the 2018 primary “had the highest number of votes in the history of California midterm elections” and that Democrats “dramatically grew their vote statewide and in most, but not all, of the House races where they hope to compete in November.”

* Speaking of the Golden State, the California GOP is scrambling after a Holocaust denier, with a lengthy history of anti-Semitic screeds, ran as a Republican and ended up on the ballot in the state’s 11th congressional district. The district is currently represented by Democrat Mark DeSaulnier, who’s heavily favored to win re-election.

* The Senate Leadership Fund, which is closely aligned with the Senate Republican leadership, announced last week it has reserved $4.2 million in airtime in Tennessee, where Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R) is taking on former Gov. Phil Bredesen (D). This matters because the Tennessee contest isn’t one GOP officials thought they’d have to worry about.

* And under bipartisan pressure to resign in the wake of groping allegations, Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill (R) delivered prepared remarks in his office this morning and presented himself as a victim.

Monday's Campaign Round-Up, 7.9.18