Monday’s campaign round-up

Updated
President Barack Obama speaks at a Terry McAuliffe campaign event at Washington-Lee High School in Arlington, Virginia, November 3, 2013.
President Barack Obama speaks at a Terry McAuliffe campaign event at Washington-Lee High School in Arlington, Virginia, November 3, 2013.
Pete Marovich/Pool
Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that won’t necessarily generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers:
 
* It’s Election Day in Virginia tomorrow, and the final polls show Terry McAuliffe (D) with a modest-but-steady advantage over Ken Cuccinelli (R) in the closely watched gubernatorial race. As of this morning, PPP shows McAuliffe by seven, 50% to 43%, while Quinnipiac shows McAuliffe with a six-point advantage, 46% to 40%.
 
* Tomorrow is also Election Day in New Jersey, where the final round of polling shows incumbent Gov. Chris Christie (R) ahead by insurmountable margins.
 
* Responding to a “whisper campaign,” U.S. Rep. Mike Michaud, the leading Democratic gubernatorial campaign in Maine, announced this morning that he is gay. Michaud, if elected next year, would be the first openly gay gubernatorial candidate to win in U.S. history. (New Jersey’s Jim McGreevy was elected in 2001, but came out in 2004.)
 
* Confirming the worst-kept secret in politics, former Gov. Charlie Crist is running to get his old job back and he’ll run as a Democrat.
 
* On a related note, Florida’s Republican incumbent governor, Rick Scott, has a political action committee, which welcomed Crist to the race by highlighting Democratic criticism of Crist from when he was a Republican.
 
* On Fox News yesterday, former Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.) was asked about his future ambitions, including possibly running for the Senate in New Hampshire. “With regard to my political future, listen, there’s a role for me,” Brown said. He then added, “This isn’t about me.”
 
* And on a related note, former Rep. Charlie Bass (R-N.H.) announced this morning that he will not take on Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.) in 2014. He joins Jeb Bradley, Frank Guinta, and former Sen. John Sununu as Republicans who considered the race before bowing out.
 

Monday's campaign round-up

Updated