Maybe the ‘Gestapo’ isn’t so bad after all?

Updated
 
Maybe the 'Gestapo' isn't so bad after all?
Maybe the 'Gestapo' isn't so bad after all?
Associated Press

Maine Gov. Paul LePage (R) caused a stir when he condemned the Supreme Court’s health care ruling, declaring, “We the people have been told there is no choice. You must buy health insurance or pay the new Gestapo – the I.R.S.” He made matters slightly worse when he said those concerned by the Nazi reference “ought to be goddamn mad at the federal government.”

It’s worth noting, however, that there is an interesting limit to the LePage rage.

[T]he most remarkable aspect of LePage’s remarks wasn’t the Nazi comparison. It was what he didn’t say: Instead of joining Republican governors of six other states in announcing he will refuse to participate in the expansion of Medicaid, he wants to wait and see how the numbers add up.

The likely reason for LePage’s reservation of judgment? The Medicaid expansion won’t cost Maine’s state government a dime – in fact, it should save the state somewhere between $65 million and $118 million over six years, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

So, LePage is outraged by the Affordable Care Act, and feels comfortable equating American officials with Nazis, but the law’s a good deal for Maine so he’s not inclined to join the Perrys, Haleys, and Jindals of his party.

I suppose we’re supposed to believe the American “Gestapo” isn’t so bad after all?

Paul LePage and Maine

Maybe the 'Gestapo' isn't so bad after all?

Updated